TOTAL SHARES 7

'Re:give me my peace of mind'_ or_'awakening' //2If you’re a blogger, you’ll know how comments make a blog. They can take the original post into a whole new level altogether, with opposing views and discussions opening up some great viewpoints.

Personally, I’ve used the comments on some of my posts (and those on other blogs) as inspiration for new posts here. I’ll add my comment on the original post, and then expand on it with a new or slightly different take. That then opens the discussion up even further, both on the new post and the original (play fair – always link back to your inspiration).

While content may be the instigator, it’s the conversations by the community that often make the content. And maybe it’s just me, but Twitter seems to be taking more of the conversations and making them 140-character bites.

I’ve seen many great posts by some truly remarkable bloggers be tweeted, and the conversation remain on Twitter. Points and questions raised in the post start the conversation rolling, but instead of via the comments section on a blog, they take place on the little blue bird nest. And that’s a shame.

There’s nothing wrong with this, of course – after all, Twitter is the king of instant feedback and interaction. And weekly events like #journchat and #blogchat , and others like them, show just how effective a medium Twitter can be for conversations. And yet…

Imagine how much a conversation could build without the limitations of 140-characters. Imagine how opposing views could be fully fleshed out with unlimited text. Imagine how communities could be forged, and new friendships built, through the reasoning and acceptance that long tail blog comments can offer. Imagine being the catalyst or inspiration for a blog post by your favourite blogger, all from a single comment you left.

Of course, you could say that it’s down to the blogger to make the content as open as possible, to encourage discussion – and this is true. Yet at the same time, maybe we (as readers) need to take part more as well? Maybe we need to encourage bloggers more by being part of their community, as opposed to rubbernecking on Twitter?

There are a myriad of ways for conversations to take place. Sometimes little snapshots like Twitter are ideal, if you’re pressed for time. But isn’t it nice to get away from the noise at times, and relax where you have time and space to say what you really want?

What’s your take?

Creative Commons License photo credit: Shirin K. A. Winiger

TOTAL SHARES 7
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152 Comments on "Is Twitter Killing Blog Comments?"


Understanding Your Blog Audience and What You Want From Them | SmallBusinessUK
2 months 17 days ago

[…] of the things many bloggers complain about is that social sites like Twitter and Google+ have seen comment numbers decrease, as conversations about a post shift to the network as opposed to taking place on the blog itself. […]

Twitter is Killing Discussion, and GamerGate Proves it | Pop Critical
4 months 25 days ago

[…] search revealed others who think Twitter is killing everything from conference discussion to blog commenting, and lots and lots of people who take umbrage with the idea that Twitter is really encouraging much […]

Understanding Your Blog Audience and What You Want From Them
1 year 16 days ago

[…] of the things many bloggers complain about is that social sites like Twitter and Google+ have seen comment numbers decrease, as conversations about a post shift to the network as opposed to taking place on the blog itself. […]

ileane
5 years 4 months ago

Danny,

I recommend that you join the Blog Engage community over at blogengage.com

The bloggers will comment on your posts, comment on the post listing at blog engage AND tweet you and retweet you until….

Since I joined last month, I’ve received a constant stream of valuable comments and interesting exchanging of information. Let me know if you need any assistance.

Thanks for sharing.
@Ileane
.-= ileane´s most recent blog post …Blog Engage Activity for Ms. Ileane Speaks in November =-.

Tatyana Gann
5 years 5 months ago

I really enjoyed your blog post. about Twitter and Blogs. I know we as bloggers, writers, connectors want to express our thoughts and 140 characters is like an appetizer and our personal blogs are main entrees…

I like the feature of disqus by the way.. Thanks for sharing Very cool…

Tatyana Gann

Tatyana Gann
5 years 5 months ago

I really enjoyed your blog post. about Twitter and Blogs. I know we as bloggers, writers, connectors want to express our thoughts and 140 characters is like an appetizer and our personal blogs are main entrees…

I like the feature of disqus by the way.. Thanks for sharing Very cool…

Tatyana Gann

Eva
5 years 6 months ago

Just passing to say its always lovely to tweet you & yes tweeters rarely have time/make effort to comment ; )
As long as they connect somewhere in the ethereal pathways isnt that all that matters?
Have a great day, Danny.

Danny Brown
5 years 6 months ago

Agreed, Eva, the connection is the most important part. The conversation area is nice but the connection is the real deal – thanks for reminding. :)

Eva
5 years 6 months ago

Just passing to say its always lovely to tweet you & yes tweeters rarely have time/make effort to comment ; )
As long as they connect somewhere in the ethereal pathways isnt that all that matters?
Have a great day, Danny.

Danny Brown
5 years 6 months ago

Agreed, Eva, the connection is the most important part. The conversation area is nice but the connection is the real deal – thanks for reminding. :)

Carol Flammer
5 years 6 months ago

Blogs provide a valuable platform for others to engage in the conversation and follow it easily without jumping between Twitter profiles or chasing a hashtag. Twitter is definitely the hottest cocktail party in town, but the blog is the foundation from which a strong social media program is built.

Danny Brown
5 years 6 months ago

I wonder if it’d be an idea to have a book reading-type convo about a blog post on Twitter? Use a hashtag to separate the chat, and then discuss the points raised in the post? Of course, this would still have discussion taking place away from the post itself (unless you could drop in the chat results using a plugin), but may keep it less fractured?

Carol Flammer
5 years 6 months ago

Blogs provide a valuable platform for others to engage in the conversation and follow it easily without jumping between Twitter profiles or chasing a hashtag. Twitter is definitely the hottest cocktail party in town, but the blog is the foundation from which a strong social media program is built.

Danny Brown
5 years 6 months ago

I wonder if it’d be an idea to have a book reading-type convo about a blog post on Twitter? Use a hashtag to separate the chat, and then discuss the points raised in the post? Of course, this would still have discussion taking place away from the post itself (unless you could drop in the chat results using a plugin), but may keep it less fractured?

Joshua Dorkin
5 years 6 months ago

Danny –
I definitely think Twitter is killing blog comments. While I certainly see a fair amount of retweets to our blog posts, I’ve seen an absolute decline in comments over the past months. Those people I’ve asked have said it is just easier to ReTweet than it is to put an ounce of effort in some thoughtful comments. While there are certainly people still commenting, I think that people seem to find it easier to share a post, rather than to comment.

Joshua Dorkin
5 years 6 months ago

Danny –
I definitely think Twitter is killing blog comments. While I certainly see a fair amount of retweets to our blog posts, I’ve seen an absolute decline in comments over the past months. Those people I’ve asked have said it is just easier to ReTweet than it is to put an ounce of effort in some thoughtful comments. While there are certainly people still commenting, I think that people seem to find it easier to share a post, rather than to comment.

valeriesimon
5 years 6 months ago

Love the idea of a system that aggregates content! Brilliant! Though it probably could only work with open forums (Twitter, public forums on LinkedIn, etc) rather than private forums like Facebook. I’ve been on a bit of a vacation the last few days, visiting some of my favorite websites via guest post. And I’ve been reflecting on this post more and more. The posts have prompted some great feedback and conversations on Facebook, within LinkedIn groups and on Twitter, but the fragmented conversation is frustrating and leaves me feeling as the complete story was never told…

Danny Brown
5 years 6 months ago

I wonder if the Facebook API would let it cross-connect though, Valerie. Like you say, obviously it’s a closed system compared to Twitter, but say you synced the Facebook Connect option on your account. Then, anytime you comment on a blog, you can have it crossed over to your Facebook wall or notes, and continue the conversation that way?

valeriesimon
5 years 6 months ago

Love the idea of a system that aggregates content! Brilliant! Though it probably could only work with open forums (Twitter, public forums on LinkedIn, etc) rather than private forums like Facebook. I’ve been on a bit of a vacation the last few days, visiting some of my favorite websites via guest post. And I’ve been reflecting on this post more and more. The posts have prompted some great feedback and conversations on Facebook, within LinkedIn groups and on Twitter, but the fragmented conversation is frustrating and leaves me feeling as the complete story was never told…

Danny Brown
5 years 6 months ago

I wonder if the Facebook API would let it cross-connect though, Valerie. Like you say, obviously it’s a closed system compared to Twitter, but say you synced the Facebook Connect option on your account. Then, anytime you comment on a blog, you can have it crossed over to your Facebook wall or notes, and continue the conversation that way?

frank barry
5 years 7 months ago

Twitter is easy. Commenting takes time. DISQUS is helping to tie it all together.

My personal take is that i try to comment on blogs i follow regularly as much as i can. i don’t always do a good job of it, but i try. i know bloggers want comments and that taking the time to connect with them on their blog mean a lot. it’s important to do.

On the Twitter note … it drives traffic like no other so if i really enjoy something i’m going to Tweet and Comment – that’s the right thing to do. It takes time, but that’s the way you can bring the most benefit to the blogger. Hands down.

http://twitter.com/franswaa

frank barry
5 years 7 months ago

Twitter is easy. Commenting takes time. DISQUS is helping to tie it all together.

My personal take is that i try to comment on blogs i follow regularly as much as i can. i don’t always do a good job of it, but i try. i know bloggers want comments and that taking the time to connect with them on their blog mean a lot. it’s important to do.

On the Twitter note … it drives traffic like no other so if i really enjoy something i’m going to Tweet and Comment – that’s the right thing to do. It takes time, but that’s the way you can bring the most benefit to the blogger. Hands down.

http://twitter.com/franswaa

SusanMazza
5 years 7 months ago

I don’t think Twitter is killing blog comments. I started blogging this year and I am very clear I would have few if any comments if it wasn’t for twitter. If the conversation travels to other platforms then so be it. It would be great to know where a conversation goes but if we made an impact I somehow believe (unscientifically speaking of course!) that the conversation will come back to us. I think what ultimately drives people to comment is the relevance of what you had to say to them and their relationship with you. If both are high they will stay and take the time to comment. And if they find you through another random source the great thing is they can actually find you and engage with you easily.

It is also not surprising that my most popular post by far was the post I did about #followfriday. That speaks to the current source of most of my blog readers – Twitter.

My biggest challenge is that a large percentage of my target audience is made up primarily of people who barely know what a blog is. They read my newsletter but very few click through to the blog. If they want to comment or ask a question they send an e-mail. For those who read blogs they are not yet comfortable making a comment for the world to see. People who use twitter and who blog are far more likely to comment. So how to I encourage the people new to social media to actually engage on my blog so the conversation can get richer? That is my bigger concern.

I also notice though that I am commenting less lately. One reason could be that I am just reading a lot more blogs and have not been taking the time to comment. The biggest reason though – I am reading a lot more on my Blackberry and commenting from there is frustratingly tedious!

Great topic Danny

Danny Brown
5 years 7 months ago

I wonder if that brings up another question: “Is Twitter changing the way we write blogs?”. I’d like to think not, but funnily enough, 4 out of my “top 5 posts” for traffic and popularity have been about Twitter (including this one). So, does Twitter narrow the topics down at times, and will people start writing more about Twitter just for the very fact there’s such a new audience for it? Guess only time will tell. :)

SusanMazza
5 years 7 months ago

I don’t think Twitter is killing blog comments. I started blogging this year and I am very clear I would have few if any comments if it wasn’t for twitter. If the conversation travels to other platforms then so be it. It would be great to know where a conversation goes but if we made an impact I somehow believe (unscientifically speaking of course!) that the conversation will come back to us. I think what ultimately drives people to comment is the relevance of what you had to say to them and their relationship with you. If both are high they will stay and take the time to comment. And if they find you through another random source the great thing is they can actually find you and engage with you easily.

It is also not surprising that my most popular post by far was the post I did about #followfriday. That speaks to the current source of most of my blog readers – Twitter.

My biggest challenge is that a large percentage of my target audience is made up primarily of people who barely know what a blog is. They read my newsletter but very few click through to the blog. If they want to comment or ask a question they send an e-mail. For those who read blogs they are not yet comfortable making a comment for the world to see. People who use twitter and who blog are far more likely to comment. So how to I encourage the people new to social media to actually engage on my blog so the conversation can get richer? That is my bigger concern.

I also notice though that I am commenting less lately. One reason could be that I am just reading a lot more blogs and have not been taking the time to comment. The biggest reason though – I am reading a lot more on my Blackberry and commenting from there is frustratingly tedious!

Great topic Danny

Danny Brown
5 years 7 months ago

I wonder if that brings up another question: “Is Twitter changing the way we write blogs?”. I’d like to think not, but funnily enough, 4 out of my “top 5 posts” for traffic and popularity have been about Twitter (including this one). So, does Twitter narrow the topics down at times, and will people start writing more about Twitter just for the very fact there’s such a new audience for it? Guess only time will tell. :)

Edward Boches
5 years 7 months ago

Danny:
I learned this first hand today and you helped. Sitting around on vacation reading blog comments and it struck me they were too agreeable. Wrote about it and presto and all day conversation, more than I had bargained for, took place on my blog. But the fact is none of that could have developed on Twitter with the same depth. It wouldn’t all sit in one place as easily accessible. And it wouldn’t have added to my own premise nearly as much. But your ideal calls for a few things. One, posts that aren’t simply easy to agree with but offer a thought provoking idea that will stimulate conversation. Two, a welcoming blogger who makes people comfortable and accepted for speaking their mind and advancing the conversation. And three, readers who are not only engaged, but who themselves are able to craft an argument, express an opinion and feel comfortable doing so. A blogger can stimulate one and two easily. And that, in fact, will lead to three.

Danny Brown
5 years 7 months ago

And it helped that your post was such a spot on and timely analysis, Edward – great piece :)

Your three paths should be Blogging 101 (although this can still come down to personal perception of both blogger and reader, I guess). They tie in quite nicely with Valerie Simon’s ideas as well, in her recent guest post:

http://dannybrown.me/2009/08/27/why-would-you-bother-to-comment/

I guess at the end of the day, it’s almost like the water-cooler at the office, and the social beers at the end of the week. Twitter’s like the water-cooler; many of the conversations are snippets to be expanded on. Then comes the end of the week drinks (the blog), and what started out as a snapshot soon expands into something more involved.

Either way, they’re both good – and conversation adds to the experience wherever the outpost.

Cheers!

Edward Boches
5 years 7 months ago

Danny:
I learned this first hand today and you helped. Sitting around on vacation reading blog comments and it struck me they were too agreeable. Wrote about it and presto and all day conversation, more than I had bargained for, took place on my blog. But the fact is none of that could have developed on Twitter with the same depth. It wouldn’t all sit in one place as easily accessible. And it wouldn’t have added to my own premise nearly as much. But your ideal calls for a few things. One, posts that aren’t simply easy to agree with but offer a thought provoking idea that will stimulate conversation. Two, a welcoming blogger who makes people comfortable and accepted for speaking their mind and advancing the conversation. And three, readers who are not only engaged, but who themselves are able to craft an argument, express an opinion and feel comfortable doing so. A blogger can stimulate one and two easily. And that, in fact, will lead to three.

Danny Brown
5 years 7 months ago

And it helped that your post was such a spot on and timely analysis, Edward – great piece :)

Your three paths should be Blogging 101 (although this can still come down to personal perception of both blogger and reader, I guess). They tie in quite nicely with Valerie Simon’s ideas as well, in her recent guest post:

http://dannybrown.me/2009/08/27/why-would-you-bother-to-comment/

I guess at the end of the day, it’s almost like the water-cooler at the office, and the social beers at the end of the week. Twitter’s like the water-cooler; many of the conversations are snippets to be expanded on. Then comes the end of the week drinks (the blog), and what started out as a snapshot soon expands into something more involved.

Either way, they’re both good – and conversation adds to the experience wherever the outpost.

Cheers!

SusanMazza
5 years 7 months ago

I don’t think Twitter is killing blog comments. In fact, if it wasn’t for twitter I would have few to none. For me I think that is because the vast majority of my current client base and target market barely knows what a blog is. Getting people not accustomed to visiting a blog (let alone commenting where the world can see) to engage online is the bigger challenge for me given I have an intention for my posts to generate dialogue.

I do see what you mean about the potential for the conversation to get fragmented. Yet I am not convinced it is. As an avid reader of books I will naturally take an idea and reference it in a blog post, a conversation with a client, and tweet about it. To me that is a demonstration of an expanding conversation rather than a diluted one. Seems to me the robustness of the conversation on our blogs is more a function of relevance to and relationship with our readers. If it goes other places as well it is a sign we have made an impact even if we have no clue about where it went beyond our blog.

Something I have noticed that may be relevant to this conversation is that as I follow more people I notice I have slipped into a mode of reading a lot more and commenting a lot less. Commenting thoughtfully takes time (I am probably think too much!) and I am reading more and more blogs. Also, I am reading a lot more on my Blackberry and commenting from there is painful! This post is a reminder for me to comment more because the conversation matters on so many levels.

Danny Brown
5 years 7 months ago

Interesting take, Susan.

So would you say that perhaps as your reach grows (on various networks as well as your blog), the interactions are less focused and more widespread? So what may appear less interaction in one area is actually completed elsewhere?

If so, there’s an immense opportunity for a smart developer to really go to town on social integration. I know some are trying but they’re not quite there yet. But if you could collate all conversations seamlessly, in real-time and with success…

SusanMazza
5 years 7 months ago

I don’t think Twitter is killing blog comments. In fact, if it wasn’t for twitter I would have few to none. For me I think that is because the vast majority of my current client base and target market barely knows what a blog is. Getting people not accustomed to visiting a blog (let alone commenting where the world can see) to engage online is the bigger challenge for me given I have an intention for my posts to generate dialogue.

I do see what you mean about the potential for the conversation to get fragmented. Yet I am not convinced it is. As an avid reader of books I will naturally take an idea and reference it in a blog post, a conversation with a client, and tweet about it. To me that is a demonstration of an expanding conversation rather than a diluted one. Seems to me the robustness of the conversation on our blogs is more a function of relevance to and relationship with our readers. If it goes other places as well it is a sign we have made an impact even if we have no clue about where it went beyond our blog.

Something I have noticed that may be relevant to this conversation is that as I follow more people I notice I have slipped into a mode of reading a lot more and commenting a lot less. Commenting thoughtfully takes time (I am probably think too much!) and I am reading more and more blogs. Also, I am reading a lot more on my Blackberry and commenting from there is painful! This post is a reminder for me to comment more because the conversation matters on so many levels.

Danny Brown
5 years 7 months ago

Interesting take, Susan.

So would you say that perhaps as your reach grows (on various networks as well as your blog), the interactions are less focused and more widespread? So what may appear less interaction in one area is actually completed elsewhere?

If so, there’s an immense opportunity for a smart developer to really go to town on social integration. I know some are trying but they’re not quite there yet. But if you could collate all conversations seamlessly, in real-time and with success…

wchingya
5 years 7 months ago

Danny,

Upon seeing your blog quote of ‘community/connection/conversation’, I can’t help but agreeing that through blog comments, we can achieve that goal better comparing to microblogging. As much as I adore Twitter, personally I still find it’s more like a convenient promotional tool. I can know a blogger better through the written post and one’s viewpoint on comments. Call me conservative, but I think Twitter as a supporter for blog instead of taking over. ^^

As of Is Twitter Killing Blog Comments? ~ well, it’s quite like the time when people though Twitter is Killing Blogging — not a chance, if we keep the blog-commenting going.

@wchingya
Social/Blogging Tracker

Danny Brown
5 years 7 months ago

Yep, perhaps the title was misleading – maybe a better one would have been “Is Twitter the New Silent Audience for Blogs”? ;-)

It’s obviously personal choice, and I’d never say one way is “righter” than the other. But, it does offer a wider scope for discussion in the comments area, as opposed to maybe catching the odd refererence in a conversation in a shorter playing field.

wchingya
5 years 7 months ago

Danny,

Upon seeing your blog quote of ‘community/connection/conversation’, I can’t help but agreeing that through blog comments, we can achieve that goal better comparing to microblogging. As much as I adore Twitter, personally I still find it’s more like a convenient promotional tool. I can know a blogger better through the written post and one’s viewpoint on comments. Call me conservative, but I think Twitter as a supporter for blog instead of taking over. ^^

As of Is Twitter Killing Blog Comments? ~ well, it’s quite like the time when people though Twitter is Killing Blogging — not a chance, if we keep the blog-commenting going.

@wchingya
Social/Blogging Tracker

Danny Brown
5 years 7 months ago

Yep, perhaps the title was misleading – maybe a better one would have been “Is Twitter the New Silent Audience for Blogs”? ;-)

It’s obviously personal choice, and I’d never say one way is “righter” than the other. But, it does offer a wider scope for discussion in the comments area, as opposed to maybe catching the odd refererence in a conversation in a shorter playing field.

Grace Boyle
5 years 7 months ago

Danny, this is a great idea and I think it has spawned a monumental conversation (I am seeing this on Twitter and all the conversation already happening here).

I really like the thoughtful, over 140-character limit, response that comes from a blog comment. The conversation doesn’t become stale (if you replied later on Twitter, the thought might already been gone or an ‘old’ tweet) and it can continue to everyone who wants to listen/read on that very blog post.

I don’t think there’s anything wrong with tweeting about blog posts, but it’s limited. It seems more about promotion and tid-bits. I do like to step away for a moment actually read blogs and comment directly. However, it is a more direct approach that isn’t as universal. As @JonBishop said, the Disqus “tweet this” functionality is great because you can incorporate both and ask others to join in.

Danny Brown
5 years 7 months ago

One of the comparisons I’ve always used for Twitter is that it’s like the teaser trailer for a movie, and your blog is the main feature. Or it’s a “Coming up at 6.00″ snippet for the news, and your blog is the prime-time news report.

Twitter is fantastic for conversations – as I mentioned in the post, look at #journchat or #blogchat for great examples. But unless you’re using a dedicated hashtag, often many comments or convos can be missed by a few people.

Now, if Lijit, Disqus and BackType can work together to create the ultimate all-in-one blog search and comment aggregator… ;-)

Grace Boyle
5 years 7 months ago

Danny, this is a great idea and I think it has spawned a monumental conversation (I am seeing this on Twitter and all the conversation already happening here).

I really like the thoughtful, over 140-character limit, response that comes from a blog comment. The conversation doesn’t become stale (if you replied later on Twitter, the thought might already been gone or an ‘old’ tweet) and it can continue to everyone who wants to listen/read on that very blog post.

I don’t think there’s anything wrong with tweeting about blog posts, but it’s limited. It seems more about promotion and tid-bits. I do like to step away for a moment actually read blogs and comment directly. However, it is a more direct approach that isn’t as universal. As @JonBishop said, the Disqus “tweet this” functionality is great because you can incorporate both and ask others to join in.

Danny Brown
5 years 7 months ago

One of the comparisons I’ve always used for Twitter is that it’s like the teaser trailer for a movie, and your blog is the main feature. Or it’s a “Coming up at 6.00″ snippet for the news, and your blog is the prime-time news report.

Twitter is fantastic for conversations – as I mentioned in the post, look at #journchat or #blogchat for great examples. But unless you’re using a dedicated hashtag, often many comments or convos can be missed by a few people.

Now, if Lijit, Disqus and BackType can work together to create the ultimate all-in-one blog search and comment aggregator… ;-)

Tanya Marcy
5 years 7 months ago

While I think Twitter can be great for quick blips, I agree – sometimes it's just a breath of fresh air to write out as much as you want in a comment. In my mind, blogs and their comments are more ideal for discussion…I really do feel more relaxed and free in that kind of online atmosphere. If you're a blogger that uses Twitter, I think the key is to integrate both so that their features play well off of each other.

Bryna
5 years 7 months ago

Are you finding that since the Twitter hype has begun, your comments have decreased significantly? It would be interesting to hear some definitive numbers, from a variety of pro bloggers. For me, it only increases traffic thus far, but I'm so new to the community, I need that extra voice and push from others (thanks heavens for the RT).

Danny Brown
5 years 7 months ago

Personally, I've seen more conversation on Twitter (which is still cool) as opposed to on the posts. That could be down to my writing or invitational skills, for sure. Or it could be to do with the medium – of my five most popular posts as far as comments go, four of them are about Twitter.

Maybe the next question should be “Is Twitter reducing the topics of blog posts”? ;-)

steverobertson
5 years 7 months ago

Twitter maybe destroying comments but is it driving up readership? Seems the problem is how to best tie the threads together.

steverobertson
5 years 7 months ago

I think it will have a limiting effect in some cases BUT I think twitter will drive more readers to blogs. I think the burden lies on us bloggers to manage them both effectively. It also causes the blogger to have to do more work to tie it all back when the threads bounce between twitter and the blog. A RIPE opportunity for some smart programmer out there!

Danny Brown
5 years 7 months ago

Agreed, Steve – if someone can aggregate all comments (that aren't just standard RT's, etc) and feed them real-time into the conversation, so that when you reply it goes back to where their comment is posted… now that's the gold right there! :)