Over at his excellent Convince and Convert blog, Jay Baer shares a post on whether it seemed white folks are the majority in social media. This feeling is based on his experience at the recent South by Southwest festival, where he noticed that the majority of people in his session were white. From Jay’s post:

“As I looked around at these events, I noticed that the vast majority of attendees appeared to be 25-39 years old (I’m actually an old fart in social media circles), and the vast majority were White. The fact is, most social media pros can easily name the handful of people of color in the business. Excellent professionals like Wayne SuttonStanford SmithShashi BellamkondaShama Kabani, and Rohit Bhargava are the exceptions that prove the rule.”

(Update – Jay wasn’t referring to his sessions in his post. It should have said “events”, and not “his session”. My apologies.)

Jay’s post goes on to ask why there isn’t more diversity in social media, and that “we have to do more than rely on a bunch of 30 year old white people” for our social media information. Again, from Jay’s post with regards diversity:

“Consequently, I do believe companies need to consider proactively adding diversity to their social media teams, to ensure that first responder and content creation teams understand the perspectives of all customers and potential customers.”

The post is an interesting read, and opens up a great discussion in the comments.

To me, though, the post misses a key point (which, to be fair, Jay addresses afterwards in the comments): there are no statistics in Jay’s post to back up his view.

While Jay’s post is a great conversation starter, the lack of statistics mean it’s still restricted.

Numbers Make a Difference

While it might look like there’s a distinct lack of diversity from the folks that were at the SxSW events in question, that’s possibly more to do with South by Southwest (or any event) than colour. It’s up to organizers to make sure that diversity is key, and I’ve heard more than one story of how the SxSW panel picking is skewed towards friends over non-biased choice.

Ignoring the South by Southwest example for now, Jay mentions in a reply to Dan Perez (who asked about statistical proof) that he didn’t have any research at hand.

Fan Perez on Jay Baer blog

The thing is, there’s a ton of research and statistics available if you do the grunt work.

If you drop over to BlackWeb 2.0, for example, you’ll find an excellent resource that’s leading the way in highlighting blacks in technology and new media. When they shared their take on a 2009 Pew Report, they showed that seven out of ten African Americans used Twitter as opposed to six in ten white people.

Additionally, their social web category shares how black people and businesses are using social media.

Over at ColorLines, which offers analysis and solutions to racial justice issues, they extend on that report a little further, and show that 13% of black internet users are on Twitter; 18% of Latin American internet users are on Twitter; but only 5% of white internet users are.

Of course, social media is much more than just Twitter. Blogging, for example, is one of the lead platforms on the social web for sharing a view and making yourself heard, and there’s no shortage of quality black bloggers online.

Over at Squidoo, for instance, there’s a lens that shares 50 of the top African Amercian blogs for black men. These range from business blogs to fatherhood blogs, political blogs and more. It’s a great list and well worth checking out (a similar one for women would be great!).

At Blogged.com, there’s also a sub-category in the Society section that covers African American blogs, and these range from feminist blogs to pop culture, as well as the issues of dealing with infertility. Again, it’s another great resource and shows how black social media users are using the platform every day.

Not Just Black and White

Stepping away from just black and white social media use in the U.S., the Hispanic and Latino movement is anything but minority, too.

I mentioned Dan Perez earlier, who’s Hispanic, and the comment he left on Jay’s post. Lauren Fernandez, an awesome Cuban PR pro, raised a great point about Latino and Hispanic use of social media in her comment:

Lauren Fernandez blog comment

Both Lauren and Dan make a great point in their comments about it not always being easy to tell someone’s race or culture based on their appearance. It’s something we’re all guilty of, and leads to a lot of incorrect assumptions that can trip us up further down the road.

A report from January 2011 over at Fox News Latino shows how Latinos are using the social web for good, as well as highlighting that Hispanics are embracing technology faster than any other demographic, despite being in the minority.

Then you have the likes of Manoj Nigam, VO of IT at Vodafone, Manish Mehta, VP Global Online for Dell, and Viraj Patel, VP of IT at BigTree Entertainment, showing businesses how they can take their companies to Wall Street with social media.

If you want a really impressive number, then the fact that 39% of Chinese sales consultants use social media to engage their customers compared to only 3% of U.S. sales consultants is pretty telling. At Asian Nation, you can find all sorts of reports, statistics, communities and more dedicated to Asian America today.

It’s Not the People

These are just some resources and stats that I found while researching around the topic of Jay’s post. While Jay’s right in that it always seems to be the same people at the same events, that skews things a bit because these people just happen to be (primarily) white.

They’re also the folks that Jay would cite as leaders in social media. Other people (myself included) would probably cite very different people and names – because that’s a natural thing to do. We always think of those we connect with most when asked about something, as opposed to taking the better route and thinking of those that are also doing really great things, but without the fanfare that Jay’s Mafia would probably get.

That doesn’t mean that white folks are dominating social media, nor does it mean there’s a lack of cultural diversity in social media.

It just means the industry needs to do a better job at recognizing people that aren’t part of the “inner circle”, if you like, and stop using “names” just to sell seats.

If you really want diversity, you first have to highlight it – the rest will fall into place naturally. So, how about it, event organizers and blog thought leaders – a bit more elbow work to let these new voices heard would be a good start, no?

And how about you? Who’s doing great things online and isn’t white? Let’s start the highlighting now – sound good?

image: Rose Cioccolato

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260 comments
DannyBrown
DannyBrown

karimacatherine thebrandbuilder You know, I may have to revisit that and update with how far we've come since then. Or not. ;-)

DannyBrown
DannyBrown

karimacatherine thebrandbuilder Damn, that's a blast from the past - and what a conversation! Thanks for the heads up, Karima! :)

Olivier Blanchard
Olivier Blanchard

Maybe diversity has nothing to do with it. Maybe the answer is far simpler than that. From where I stand, it says something about 30-40 year old white dudes that so many of them feel compelled to spend all day talking about social media and how to get better at social media, and how to make more money with social media and how to get more followers on social media and how to be more time-efficient on social media and how to measure their influence on social media and how to get jobs through social media and how to become speakers and experts and gurus and f***ing ninjas on social media, and everyone else doesn't. Maybe the fact that no one else does this is because most other people out there in the real world are more concerned with solving real problems than becoming the next Seth Godin? And because these folks are out there doing real work instead of pontificating about Google + or investing in one another on Empire Avenue, they neither have time nor feel the need to create idealized versions of themselves on the interwebs (you know, a version in which they are brilliant and cool and successful instead of being your garden variety slob.) I could be wrong, but from where I stand, there is no diversity problem in social media. I see every religion, nationality, ethnicity, culture and community represented in the social web. You know why? Because I, like you, see beyond the glow of our own little imaginary twitternet stars. The guys I learn from are in Asia. In Africa. In Europe. In the Middle East. In Latin America. They aren't just SxSW and Blogworld speakers. They aren't experts or gurus either. The only real problem touching on diversity I see in the "social media space" is this: About four dozen assholes in the US and Canada making up an imaginary social media "industry," who suddenly realized a week ago that with all the navel-gazing and ego projection fueling their "thought leadership," they have mostly managed to cater to people who conveniently look and sound just like them. Wow. How did THAT happen? By the by, if they ever manage to pull their heads out of their asses long enough to get some oxygen back into their brains, they will either meet or remember having met - among hundreds of thousands of other social media users who are not pre-midlife crisis white dudes - Rohit Bhargava, Maz Nadjm, Jeremiah Owyang, Gabrielle Laine Peters, Karima Catherine Goudiam, Bonin Bough, Liva Judic, Monika Melsha, Guy Kawasaki, Chris Penn, Danielle Lewis, Peter Kim, Charlene Li, CD, Hajj Flemings, and many, many, MANY more, who last time I checked, contributed more to the social media world than all of their "white" social media guru blog post combined, and managed to do so while being other than strictly caucasian. What's the next big topic for the "we've run out of things to talk about social media guru" crowd: Why aren't there more foreigners involved in social media? Someone really needs to pinpoint the exact moment when "social media expert" became synonymous with "dumbass" so we can add that to Wikipedia.

Tito Philips, Jnr.
Tito Philips, Jnr.

I am not just black, I am from Nigeria, if you know what that means online, then I would say it's not just about diversity, sometimes, it is also about nationality.

Somehow, i think it's just a way of life if you ask me, I think whites naturally like to try out new things first while others just sit and watch. In the end, they get there way ahead of everyone.

Another key point was mentioned by JK, blacks are somewhat competitive. Until now, I used to think that was only peculiar to Nigerians, but reading what he wrote made me think about it all over again, there's truth in that.

While all of these differences do exist in the blogosphere, i still think in all sincerity, bloggers no matter the color are the most collaborative and helpful people in the world. There is something about blogging, that naturally transcend the spirit of competition. I can't say whether it's because of the interdependent criteria placed on us by Google or because of the social nature of blogging itself, somehow we are just naturally more open to one another than most people living.

So as for me, don't think the diversity can withstand the power of synergy on which blogging has been thriving on for these long.

Thank you Dan for sharing this, it was really bold of you!

Tito Philips, Jnr.
Tito Philips, Jnr.

I am not just black, I am from Nigeria, if you know what that means online, then I would say it's not just about diversity, sometimes, it is also about nationality. Somehow, i think it's just a way of life if you ask me, I think whites naturally like to try out new things first while others just sit and watch. In the end, they get there way ahead of everyone. Another key point was mentioned by JK, blacks are somewhat competitive. Until now, I used to think that was only peculiar to Nigerians, but reading what he wrote made me think about it all over again, there's truth in that. While all of these differences do exist in the blogosphere, i still think in all sincerity, bloggers no matter the color are the most collaborative and helpful people in the world. There is something about blogging, that naturally transcend the spirit of competition. I can't say whether it's because of the interdependent criteria placed on us by Google or because of the social nature of blogging itself, somehow we are just naturally more open to one another than most people living. So as for me, don't think the diversity can withstand the power of synergy on which blogging has been thriving on for these long. Thank you Dan for sharing this, it was really bold of you!

Tito Philips, Jnr.
Tito Philips, Jnr.

I am not just black, I am from Nigeria, if you know what that means online, then I would say it's not just about diversity, sometimes, it is also about nationality.

Somehow, i think it's just a way of life if you ask me, I think whites naturally like to try out new things first while others just sit and watch. In the end, they get there way ahead of everyone.

Another key point was mentioned by JK, blacks are somewhat competitive. Until now, I used to think that was only peculiar to Nigerians, but reading what he wrote made me think about it all over again, there's truth in that.

While all of these differences do exist in the blogosphere, i still think in all sincerity, bloggers no matter the color are the most collaborative and helpful people in the world. There is something about blogging, that naturally transcend the spirit of competition. I can't say whether it's because of the interdependent criteria placed on us by Google or because of the social nature of blogging itself, somehow we are just naturally more open to one another than most people living.

So as for me, don't think the diversity can withstand the power of synergy on which blogging has been thriving on for these long.

Thank you Dan for sharing this, it was really bold of you!

Eric Davis
Eric Davis

The Whole concept of RACE is very ignorant and really doesn't exist. RACE is a concept that was created by the falsely alleged founding fathers of western civilization. It has been intentionally perpetuated by their descendants (along with U.S. government, the mainstream media, and the public school system). In simple terms, there is NO such thing as a White/Caucasion person nor a Black/Negro/African American person. These are such stupid terms based on a group of people trying to define themselves and/or define others based on irrelevant, small physical differences in appearance (like hair or skin color). Who you are as a person is based upon your character. Character is your actions and results of you actions- this is what defines YOU. http://doiop.com/Character2011

Eric Davis
Eric Davis

The Whole concept of RACE is very ignorant and really doesn't exist. RACE is a concept that was created by the falsely alleged founding fathers of western civilization. It has been intentionally perpetuated by their descendants (along with U.S. government, the mainstream media, and the public school system). In simple terms, there is NO such thing as a White/Caucasion person nor a Black/Negro/African American person. These are such stupid terms based on a group of people trying to define themselves and/or define others based on irrelevant, small physical differences in appearance (like hair or skin color).

Who you are as a person is based upon your character. Character is your actions and results of you actions- this is what defines YOU.

http://doiop.com/Character2011

Eric Davis
Eric Davis

The Whole concept of RACE is very ignorant and really doesn't exist. RACE is a concept that was created by the falsely alleged founding fathers of western civilization. It has been intentionally perpetuated by their descendants (along with U.S. government, the mainstream media, and the public school system). In simple terms, there is NO such thing as a White/Caucasion person nor a Black/Negro/African American person. These are such stupid terms based on a group of people trying to define themselves and/or define others based on irrelevant, small physical differences in appearance (like hair or skin color).

Who you are as a person is based upon your character. Character is your actions and results of you actions- this is what defines YOU.

http://doiop.com/Character2011

Mitch Mitchell
Mitch Mitchell

Man, I can't believe how long it took me to get over here and get into this conversation; I must be slipping! lol I wrote my opinion on this overall topic in January. It was prompted by a visit to Problogger to view an article that someone wanted me to see. One of the guest writers wrote a post highlighting 40 people she'd met at a conference that she felt others should follow. None of them was a person of color. Someone else mentioned it and that person got lambasted. I decided to say something and I took my shots as well. One woman even wrote that it was racist of me to expect that this woman should have included a person of color on her list; that was interesting to say the least. I can't talk about all minorities, so I'll only talk about black people. I think JK stated it clearly enough when he mentioned that there aren't a lot of people who look like "us" that are considered as top bloggers in the blogosphere. I wrote a post trying to highlight some highly ranked black bloggers and I could only find 8 individual bloggers whose Alexa rankings were under 200,000, not including my own blog; that was astounding. If you look at a site called Gurudaq, which supposedly tracks internet marketing gurus, there's only one black person on the list. If you look at the second list they have, which tracks motivational people, there's only one black person on the list. Are there black people in social media? Obviously. Are there enough that are known or highlighted anywhere? Not even close. Time Magazine puts out its list of top 100 every year; never any black people on the list. Some other top bloggers put out top blogger lists; almost never any black people on the list. People tend to highlight and talk about who they know; they don't know us. For that matter "we" don't know us, which is why I was glad to see the list of 31 that Marlee put together. And that's why one of these years I'm going to have to find myself a way to get to one of the BWB conferences. This was a great topic, Danny, and look at all the responses you got. In an odd way, this is indicative of what I'm kind of talking about. I write about diversity and race on my blog all the time and get few responses most of the time; you write about it and look at the high number. Jay wrote about it and look at the high number. Quite an interesting dichotomy, one might say. But we ain't mad; we be comin'! ;-)

Mitch Mitchell
Mitch Mitchell

Man, I can't believe how long it took me to get over here and get into this conversation; I must be slipping! lol

I wrote my opinion on this overall topic in January. It was prompted by a visit to Problogger to view an article that someone wanted me to see. One of the guest writers wrote a post highlighting 40 people she'd met at a conference that she felt others should follow. None of them was a person of color. Someone else mentioned it and that person got lambasted. I decided to say something and I took my shots as well. One woman even wrote that it was racist of me to expect that this woman should have included a person of color on her list; that was interesting to say the least.

I can't talk about all minorities, so I'll only talk about black people. I think JK stated it clearly enough when he mentioned that there aren't a lot of people who look like "us" that are considered as top bloggers in the blogosphere. I wrote a post trying to highlight some highly ranked black bloggers and I could only find 8 individual bloggers whose Alexa rankings were under 200,000, not including my own blog; that was astounding. If you look at a site called Gurudaq, which supposedly tracks internet marketing gurus, there's only one black person on the list. If you look at the second list they have, which tracks motivational people, there's only one black person on the list.

Are there black people in social media? Obviously. Are there enough that are known or highlighted anywhere? Not even close. Time Magazine puts out its list of top 100 every year; never any black people on the list. Some other top bloggers put out top blogger lists; almost never any black people on the list. People tend to highlight and talk about who they know; they don't know us. For that matter "we" don't know us, which is why I was glad to see the list of 31 that Marlee put together. And that's why one of these years I'm going to have to find myself a way to get to one of the BWB conferences.

This was a great topic, Danny, and look at all the responses you got. In an odd way, this is indicative of what I'm kind of talking about. I write about diversity and race on my blog all the time and get few responses most of the time; you write about it and look at the high number. Jay wrote about it and look at the high number. Quite an interesting dichotomy, one might say.

But we ain't mad; we be comin'! ;-)

Mitch Mitchell
Mitch Mitchell

Man, I can't believe how long it took me to get over here and get into this conversation; I must be slipping! lol

I wrote my opinion on this overall topic in January. It was prompted by a visit to Problogger to view an article that someone wanted me to see. One of the guest writers wrote a post highlighting 40 people she'd met at a conference that she felt others should follow. None of them was a person of color. Someone else mentioned it and that person got lambasted. I decided to say something and I took my shots as well. One woman even wrote that it was racist of me to expect that this woman should have included a person of color on her list; that was interesting to say the least.

I can't talk about all minorities, so I'll only talk about black people. I think JK stated it clearly enough when he mentioned that there aren't a lot of people who look like "us" that are considered as top bloggers in the blogosphere. I wrote a post trying to highlight some highly ranked black bloggers and I could only find 8 individual bloggers whose Alexa rankings were under 200,000, not including my own blog; that was astounding. If you look at a site called Gurudaq, which supposedly tracks internet marketing gurus, there's only one black person on the list. If you look at the second list they have, which tracks motivational people, there's only one black person on the list.

Are there black people in social media? Obviously. Are there enough that are known or highlighted anywhere? Not even close. Time Magazine puts out its list of top 100 every year; never any black people on the list. Some other top bloggers put out top blogger lists; almost never any black people on the list. People tend to highlight and talk about who they know; they don't know us. For that matter "we" don't know us, which is why I was glad to see the list of 31 that Marlee put together. And that's why one of these years I'm going to have to find myself a way to get to one of the BWB conferences.

This was a great topic, Danny, and look at all the responses you got. In an odd way, this is indicative of what I'm kind of talking about. I write about diversity and race on my blog all the time and get few responses most of the time; you write about it and look at the high number. Jay wrote about it and look at the high number. Quite an interesting dichotomy, one might say.

But we ain't mad; we be comin'! ;-)

Margie Clayman (@margeclayman)
Margie Clayman (@margeclayman)

I'd also like to toss into the fracas the fact that none of the leading professionals in Social Media are Little People. Just sayin...:)

Margie Clayman (@margeclayman)
Margie Clayman (@margeclayman)

I'd also like to toss into the fracas the fact that none of the leading professionals in Social Media are Little People.

Just sayin...:)

Lisa Irby
Lisa Irby

I have been earning a full time living online (affiliate marketer) since 2006 and making money since 1998 -- One thing I've noticed is that the amount of minorities represented at these events is always pretty scarce... yet I meet a lot of minorities through social media. Also, because I am black more blacks tend to reach out to me on social media because of the familiarity issue. So I think blacks are definitely online (I have a site on black hair care and we are definitely out here.) As Ileane said, maybe minorities aren't attending these conferences, but they are definitely using social media in large numbers. I think it depends on where you look and I definitely agree with some of the points JK mentioned above, unfortunately. Great post!!

Lisa Irby
Lisa Irby

I have been earning a full time living online (affiliate marketer) since 2006 and making money since 1998 -- One thing I've noticed is that the amount of minorities represented at these events is always pretty scarce... yet I meet a lot of minorities through social media.

Also, because I am black more blacks tend to reach out to me on social media because of the familiarity issue. So I think blacks are definitely online (I have a site on black hair care and we are definitely out here.)

As Ileane said, maybe minorities aren't attending these conferences, but they are definitely using social media in large numbers. I think it depends on where you look and I definitely agree with some of the points JK mentioned above, unfortunately.

Great post!!

Lisa Irby
Lisa Irby

I have been earning a full time living online (affiliate marketer) since 2006 and making money since 1998 -- One thing I've noticed is that the amount of minorities represented at these events is always pretty scarce... yet I meet a lot of minorities through social media.

Also, because I am black more blacks tend to reach out to me on social media because of the familiarity issue. So I think blacks are definitely online (I have a site on black hair care and we are definitely out here.)

As Ileane said, maybe minorities aren't attending these conferences, but they are definitely using social media in large numbers. I think it depends on where you look and I definitely agree with some of the points JK mentioned above, unfortunately.

Great post!!

karimacatherine
karimacatherine

DannyBrown : Was actually gonna do that as well. " The reality or lure of diversity in Social media" thebrandbuilder

Danny
Danny

Hey there Tito, Couldn't agree more on the blogger angle, mate - I've been (and continue to be) amazed at the friendships and genuine people I've met in the blogosphere. Do you think it's more a question of black competitiveness holding people back, or not as many opportunities to be in "at the start", or a mix of both, or something completely different? But yeah, here's to synergy and combined energies every day. :)

Danny
Danny

Hey there Tito,

Couldn't agree more on the blogger angle, mate - I've been (and continue to be) amazed at the friendships and genuine people I've met in the blogosphere.

Do you think it's more a question of black competitiveness holding people back, or not as many opportunities to be in "at the start", or a mix of both, or something completely different?

But yeah, here's to synergy and combined energies every day. :)

Danny
Danny

Hey there Mitch, It does seem like a vicious circle, mate. The bloggers and leaders are there; but because the recognition isn't (or doesn't seem to be), then that skews where the conversations are taking place. And then the circle continues, because the audience is (still?) in the "wrong" place. Go figure. Thing is, as some commenters here have mentioned, is it down to the audience to promote more; the blogger; a bit of both; or something different altogether? Food for thought, for sure.

Danny
Danny

Hey there Mitch,

It does seem like a vicious circle, mate. The bloggers and leaders are there; but because the recognition isn't (or doesn't seem to be), then that skews where the conversations are taking place.

And then the circle continues, because the audience is (still?) in the "wrong" place.

Go figure.

Thing is, as some commenters here have mentioned, is it down to the audience to promote more; the blogger; a bit of both; or something different altogether?

Food for thought, for sure.

Danny
Danny

Hey there Mitch,

It does seem like a vicious circle, mate. The bloggers and leaders are there; but because the recognition isn't (or doesn't seem to be), then that skews where the conversations are taking place.

And then the circle continues, because the audience is (still?) in the "wrong" place.

Go figure.

Thing is, as some commenters here have mentioned, is it down to the audience to promote more; the blogger; a bit of both; or something different altogether?

Food for thought, for sure.

Danny
Danny

Which reminds me - I need to read your blog post on this very topic! :)

Danny
Danny

Which reminds me - I need to read your blog post on this very topic! :)

Danny
Danny

Hi Lisa, It never fails to amaze (and disappoint) when I see a new conference announced, and you see the same names with the same topics and the same presentations they were doing 6-12 months ago. And then we have posts and conversations like this, and wonder when it's going to improve... Here's to organizers looking in better places than the same 30 names that always seem to be the de facto... ;-)

Danny
Danny

Hi Lisa,

It never fails to amaze (and disappoint) when I see a new conference announced, and you see the same names with the same topics and the same presentations they were doing 6-12 months ago.

And then we have posts and conversations like this, and wonder when it's going to improve...

Here's to organizers looking in better places than the same 30 names that always seem to be the de facto... ;-)

DannyBrown
DannyBrown

karimacatherine thebrandbuilder Look forward to it if you do, and clearly still a topic that hasn't any defined answers, it would seem.

Mitch Mitchell
Mitch Mitchell

No one wants the equivalent of a handout, Danny. We do want our little bit of recognition if we do well, though. I look at someone like Lisa Irby, PR4, Alexa rank around 5,000, a higher rank than Chris Brogan and equal to Seth Godin, and wonder why her name doesn't come up as one of the top individual bloggers on the planet, and I mean ever. You don't get to rank that high without people knowing who you are, so what's the reason? When you remove everything else, sometimes the most obvious yet distasteful thing left is the truth. I'm just sayin'...

Mitch Mitchell
Mitch Mitchell

No one wants the equivalent of a handout, Danny. We do want our little bit of recognition if we do well, though. I look at someone like Lisa Irby, PR4, Alexa rank around 5,000, a higher rank than Chris Brogan and equal to Seth Godin, and wonder why her name doesn't come up as one of the top individual bloggers on the planet, and I mean ever. You don't get to rank that high without people knowing who you are, so what's the reason? When you remove everything else, sometimes the most obvious yet distasteful thing left is the truth.

I'm just sayin'...

Mitch Mitchell
Mitch Mitchell

No one wants the equivalent of a handout, Danny. We do want our little bit of recognition if we do well, though. I look at someone like Lisa Irby, PR4, Alexa rank around 5,000, a higher rank than Chris Brogan and equal to Seth Godin, and wonder why her name doesn't come up as one of the top individual bloggers on the planet, and I mean ever. You don't get to rank that high without people knowing who you are, so what's the reason? When you remove everything else, sometimes the most obvious yet distasteful thing left is the truth.

I'm just sayin'...

DannyBrown
DannyBrown

karimacatherine thebrandbuilder Alrighty :)

DannyBrown
DannyBrown

karimacatherine thebrandbuilder For sure, miss - next week?

karimacatherine
karimacatherine

DannyBrown thebrandbuilder would love to have your input! Skype soon?

Ileane
Ileane

Danny, I love what Mitch is saying here. Let's pretend Lisa Irby was speaking at SXSW - I'd sign up without hesitation.

Danny
Danny

Unfortunately I don't have the answer for that, Mitch, you'd have to ask the folks that put the events together. I like BlogWorld's approach, where they ask their community who they'd like to see, as opposed to leaving it to the Old Boys Club that so many other events seem to work from. But often, organizers (or the PR team that puts events together initially by sourcing presenters) often ook at blog authority, or site authority, and less is being put on PR and Alexa and more on subscribers and social connections.

Mitch Mitchell
Mitch Mitchell

The point isn't PR or Alexa; that point is what makes Lisa, or many other people, less of an authority in the eyes of those putting together lists and conference speakers than these other people?

Danny
Danny

Good point re. the traffic; though perhaps people are putting less authority on Page Rank and Alexa now, and looking more for social proof from the likes of RSS Subscribers and Twitter followers, as opposed to what the "mainstream web" thinks? Dunno, mate, but then that's why I never take much scope in numbers, and look at the content instead. At which Lisa more than definitely rocks it. :)

Ileane
Ileane

Danny, I love what Mitch is saying here. Let's pretend Lisa Irby was speaking at SXSW - I'd sign up without hesitation.

Danny
Danny

Unfortunately I don't have the answer for that, Mitch, you'd have to ask the folks that put the events together.

I like BlogWorld's approach, where they ask their community who they'd like to see, as opposed to leaving it to the Old Boys Club that so many other events seem to work from.

But often, organizers (or the PR team that puts events together initially by sourcing presenters) often ook at blog authority, or site authority, and less is being put on PR and Alexa and more on subscribers and social connections.

Mitch Mitchell
Mitch Mitchell

The point isn't PR or Alexa; that point is what makes Lisa, or many other people, less of an authority in the eyes of those putting together lists and conference speakers than these other people?

Danny
Danny

Good point re. the traffic; though perhaps people are putting less authority on Page Rank and Alexa now, and looking more for social proof from the likes of RSS Subscribers and Twitter followers, as opposed to what the "mainstream web" thinks?

Dunno, mate, but then that's why I never take much scope in numbers, and look at the content instead. At which Lisa more than definitely rocks it. :)

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