Why I’m Hesitant About Triberr

Why I’m Hesitant About Triberr

Triberr - The Reach Multiplier

This is a guest post by Neicole Crepeau.

Triberr is taking the blogging world by storm. And my hat is off to its creators, Dino Dogan and Daniel Cristo for trying to help smaller bloggers like myself get exposure.

I can definitely understand the appeal of Triberr, Twitterfeed, and other RSS auto-post systems. I find myself hesitant to use them, though. As a content curator, they don’t meet my needs–and I’m worried they’re just adding to the noise.

Triberr, Twitterfeed, and Similar Tools

Triberr offers a quid-pro-quo arrangement with other bloggers. You become part of up to four tribes. They tweet your blog posts (the timing handled by Triberr), and you tweet their’s. By default, this just happens automatically without you having to think about it.

(Note that Triberr recently did add a feature that allows you to change your settings so that you can choose which content to tweet. It was built for and optimized for auto-tweeting, though, and that’s the scenario I’m discussing.)

Triberr makes the quid-pro-quo arrangement explicit–and fun. These kinds of arrangements have been taking place informally for a long time.  Most of us active in content creation also share other people’s content on a regular basis, and we naturally end up with a specific set of bloggers or sources whose content we tend to read and share.

Reaching a Larger Audience

Of course, we all want our content to reach a larger audience. It’s one of the key reasons we participate in social media. It’s one of the reasons that we share other bloggers’ content.

Triberr touts the increased reach that bloggers get by joining tribes. Its tagline is “The Reach Multiplier!”. So, ultimately, like an advertising network, it’s about getting views and clicks. I have no doubt that using Triberr, or any quid-pro-quo system, will get my links in front of more people. The problem is two-fold:

  • Are my links getting in front of the right audience?
  • Am I short-changing my audience to do it?

Content Curation versus Content Inundation

As I said, I consider myself a content curator. I am selective about the posts that I share.  I take pride in reading each one before sharing it.  I share content that I think my particular audience, or the audience I’m trying to build, will find of value. I know they are flooded with content. I like to think they trust that what I share is going to be worth clicking on.

There are bloggers whose content I routinely share. Even with those bloggers, though, I don’t share every post. Even for the blogs I helped start (SMB Collective) or am a regular contributor to (Mark Schaefer’s Grow blog), I don’t share every post. I share those that are relevant to my audience and of high quality.

If a person auto-tweets every post from my blog, then they aren’t being selective. They aren’t choosing the posts relevant to their audience. I bet they don’t have a quality bar, either. Yes, I want my content to be shared. But what I really want is for my content to be shared by someone whose judgement his or her followers trust, and whose audience is the target audience I’m trying to reach.

We are inundated with information, links, content. The problem is just getting worse. When people auto-share every post from everyone in their network, they just add to the problem, inundating people with more links.

The Value of the Curator

That’s why I personally think that true curators are going to become more valuable. As we try to filter out all the junk and focus our time on consuming really good content, we will rely on selected tools and selected individuals.

Some websites and applications are trying to help surface the best content to those who are seeking it. There will be a role for these tools: Flipboard, Zite, Alltop, and the like. They will be locations for people to go to when they are in the consumption mode, actively looking for information on a topic or ready to sit down and do their daily reading.

More and more, though, people get their content primarily in small snippets, through friends and their online networks. They receive it in small chunks: a post on Facebook, or LinkedIn, or Twitter. They click because a particular headline grabs them.

There is evidence to suggest that we are becoming more selective about the pages we Like. Similarly, as content marketing and the content volume grows, we’ll become more selective about the people we follow. As a blogger or curator trying to build an audience, it will become even more important to pick your niche and create and share quality content about your selected topic. People will choose to follow and to really pay attention to the content shared by curators who have proved themselves trustworthy.

For that reason, and just my own personal integrity, I’m not willing to auto-tweet. I don’t want to be part of the problem, and I want to maintain my own reputation–because I think having a reputation as a good content curator is going to become more and more valuable.

What about you? Can automated syndication work, or does manual curation seem the better approach?

Neicole CrepeauAbout the author: Neicole Crepeau is a speaker, blogger, columnist at {grow}, and co-founder of SMB Collective. She works at Coherent Interactive on social media, website design, mobile apps, & marketing. Connect with Neicole on Twitter at @neicolec.

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Danny Brown
Co-author Influence Marketing: How to Create, Manage and Measure Brand Influencers in Social Media Marketing. #1 marketing blog in world as per HubSpot. Husband. Father. Optimist. Pragmatist. Never says no to a good single malt. You can find me on Twitter - Google+ - LinkedIn.
285 comments
executiveoasis
executiveoasis

There is somethig that a lot of  people forget about Triberr. Manual sharing is the default. To put tribe members on "automatic shaing" it costs. You pay using bones that you have pre-purchased with REAL money. I doublt that most users will pay for something that they can do for free. It's human nature. I notice that Tribe members take the time and share selectively.

executiveoasis
executiveoasis

There is somethig that a lot of  people forget about Triberr. Manual sharing is the default. To put tribe members on "automatic shaing" it costs. You pay using bones that you have pre-purchased with REAL money. I doublt that most users will pay for something that they can do for free. It's human nature. I notice that Tribe members take the time and share selectively.

PeterMasters
PeterMasters

@DannyBrown@crumpyliciousblog My pleasure Danny!!

DannyBrown
DannyBrown

@PeterMasters Thanks for jumping in and sharing that info with @crumpyliciousblog , Peter - will keep my eye on Subjot.

crumpyliciousblog
crumpyliciousblog

Thanks for the info. Will check those out and see if I can utilize them.=)

PeterMasters
PeterMasters

@crumpyliciousblog I can see your point and fair comment, no one with a good sized following does or would even want to read every Tweet. On that very subject, Subjot has come up with a great Twitter alternative, where you follow individuals particular subjects rather than just individuals. A simple but inspired idea and even thought it's currently in private beta, it's getting some good press. Back to Triberr, I believe that triberr's analytics show how many retweets people receive and therefore, if someone's post never received any it would indicate the posts were no good, irrelevant or they were just in the wrong tribe. To me Triberr is a great marketing tool. Best regards, thanks for the post, Peter

crumpyliciousblog
crumpyliciousblog

After reading your post, it makes me wonder whether twitter needs curation at all because everyone I follow tweets and some of them are relevant to me and some I rather not care about. But it doesn't really bother me that they tweet like that.

crumpyliciousblog
crumpyliciousblog

After reading your post, it makes me wonder whether twitter needs curation at all because everyone I follow tweets and some of them are relevant to me and some I rather not care about. But it doesn't really bother me that they tweet like that.

Danny Brown
Danny Brown

Thanks, miss, gotta love having both sides of the coin and I love how Neicole presented it, and Dan/Dino's willingness to answer. :)

Judy Dunn
Judy Dunn

This one really spoke to me, Danny. Addressed a lot of my concerns.

Judy Dunn
Judy Dunn

This one really spoke to me, Danny. Addressed a lot of my concerns.

Clay Morgan
Clay Morgan

Read the post and am pondering. When I should be working. Thanks Danny. ;-)

Niall Harbison
Niall Harbison

I'm with you in that totally against these sorts of sites. Surely there has to be a bigger reason to be blogging rather than automatically tweeting other people's blog posts in return for a tiny piece of traffic. What if I write a blog post saying "All Arabs should be shot" and you go ahead and RT that? Add in the fact that Twitter sends tiny amounts of traffic and you get why I think this is a such a bad idea.

Niall Harbison
Niall Harbison

I'm with you in that totally against these sorts of sites. Surely there has to be a bigger reason to be blogging rather than automatically tweeting other people's blog posts in return for a tiny piece of traffic. What if I write a blog post saying "All Arabs should be shot" and you go ahead and RT that? Add in the fact that Twitter sends tiny amounts of traffic and you get why I think this is a such a bad idea.

Meredith
Meredith

Thanks for the very informative article, Neicole. The company I work with, StoryCrawler, makes content curation pretty easy. It brings in information from across the Internet (blogs, news sites, social media, video, etc.) based on specific keywords the user wants to track. The user can then log into the dashboard and quickly curate the content for fast publication on any Internet or mobile platform. It's the perfect combination of automation and human curation.

Meredith
Meredith

Thanks for the very informative article, Neicole. The company I work with, StoryCrawler, makes content curation pretty easy. It brings in information from across the Internet (blogs, news sites, social media, video, etc.) based on specific keywords the user wants to track. The user can then log into the dashboard and quickly curate the content for fast publication on any Internet or mobile platform. It's the perfect combination of automation and human curation.

Gabrielle
Gabrielle

Has anyone noticed that if you add a Twitter application like Twitpic or similar, that they have a clause in the agreement you have to click before giving you access that they're allowed to post tweets on your behalf? I thought that was kinda scary...

Here's what I read from one application:
"This application will be able to:

* Read Tweets from your timeline.
* See who you follow, and follow new people.
* Update your profile.
* Post Tweets on your behalf.

This application will not be able to:

* Access your private messages.
* See your Twitter password."

Of course all heck would break loose if one of these applications ever posted on my behalf... and I'm sure anyone who agrees with this post. Still, it makes me wonder why they put that in the agreement in the first place.

Hand select posts myself, but schedule them to go out so as not to overwhelm anyone with what I'm reading at the moment, which is usually back to back posts.

Gabrielle
Gabrielle

Has anyone noticed that if you add a Twitter application like Twitpic or similar, that they have a clause in the agreement you have to click before giving you access that they're allowed to post tweets on your behalf? I thought that was kinda scary... Here's what I read from one application: "This application will be able to: * Read Tweets from your timeline. * See who you follow, and follow new people. * Update your profile. * Post Tweets on your behalf. This application will not be able to: * Access your private messages. * See your Twitter password." Of course all heck would break loose if one of these applications ever posted on my behalf... and I'm sure anyone who agrees with this post. Still, it makes me wonder why they put that in the agreement in the first place. Hand select posts myself, but schedule them to go out so as not to overwhelm anyone with what I'm reading at the moment, which is usually back to back posts.

Gabrielle
Gabrielle

Has anyone noticed that if you add a Twitter application like Twitpic or similar, that they have a clause in the agreement you have to click before giving you access that they're allowed to post tweets on your behalf? I thought that was kinda scary...

Here's what I read from one application:
"This application will be able to:

* Read Tweets from your timeline.
* See who you follow, and follow new people.
* Update your profile.
* Post Tweets on your behalf.

This application will not be able to:

* Access your private messages.
* See your Twitter password."

Of course all heck would break loose if one of these applications ever posted on my behalf... and I'm sure anyone who agrees with this post. Still, it makes me wonder why they put that in the agreement in the first place.

Hand select posts myself, but schedule them to go out so as not to overwhelm anyone with what I'm reading at the moment, which is usually back to back posts.

Danny
Danny

Hey there guys, Can I just say, Whoa! :) Neicole, thank you again for such a great guest post, and for starting such an awesome discussion from both sides of the fence. This is what's so great about blogging, and why I love the community here - points of view and counterpoints handled with respect and grace :) And the Triberr guys for always being so responsive, and for acknowledging where they can improve - please stay like this even when you become monster-size huge! ;-)

Danny
Danny

Hey there guys,

Can I just say, Whoa! :)

Neicole, thank you again for such a great guest post, and for starting such an awesome discussion from both sides of the fence. This is what's so great about blogging, and why I love the community here - points of view and counterpoints handled with respect and grace :)

And the Triberr guys for always being so responsive, and for acknowledging where they can improve - please stay like this even when you become monster-size huge! ;-)

Sharel Omer
Sharel Omer

Whoo..

What an amazing post and important discussion....

I love it.. a lot of passion.. gr8 stuff :)

General speaking, when you look at relationship building on social media, then most users learn to filter the noise of mass/broadcast marketing...

I'm not a blogger, so i dont have a tribe.. but i'm in some tribes.. helping some bloggers i love to spread their word to my followers..

We learn that most twitter users don't really read their feed, and if a person follow many people he gets a lot of tweets ...

So...i see this discussion is more about the change in broadcast marketing and the importance of a more personal approach towards marketing in the social world...

Thank you for this discussion... i learned a lot from it.
Sharel

Sharel Omer
Sharel Omer

Whoo.. What an amazing post and important discussion.... I love it.. a lot of passion.. gr8 stuff :) General speaking, when you look at relationship building on social media, then most users learn to filter the noise of mass/broadcast marketing... I'm not a blogger, so i dont have a tribe.. but i'm in some tribes.. helping some bloggers i love to spread their word to my followers.. We learn that most twitter users don't really read their feed, and if a person follow many people he gets a lot of tweets ... So...i see this discussion is more about the change in broadcast marketing and the importance of a more personal approach towards marketing in the social world... Thank you for this discussion... i learned a lot from it. Sharel

Sharel Omer
Sharel Omer

Whoo..

What an amazing post and important discussion....

I love it.. a lot of passion.. gr8 stuff :)

General speaking, when you look at relationship building on social media, then most users learn to filter the noise of mass/broadcast marketing...

I'm not a blogger, so i dont have a tribe.. but i'm in some tribes.. helping some bloggers i love to spread their word to my followers..

We learn that most twitter users don't really read their feed, and if a person follow many people he gets a lot of tweets ...

So...i see this discussion is more about the change in broadcast marketing and the importance of a more personal approach towards marketing in the social world...

Thank you for this discussion... i learned a lot from it.
Sharel

Karen Bice
Karen Bice

Hi Neicole. Interesting post. I'm a fan of Triberr and maybe it's because I'm not blogging (maybe someday soon) and I'm not in marketing. I really enjoyed seeing the different Triberr tweets for so many bloggers I wouldn't have known about without Triberr. Now, I'm assuming because of the option to not auto post the tweets, I don't see any Triberr related tweets. My stream feels really boring now, and most non-Triberr tweets being constantly shared are plain boring. I estimate at least 80% of tweeters could hold back 80% of their tweets in the interest of not boring their audience to death. I mean, how many times can a subject be regurgitated to death? Like I said, interesting post. :)

Karen Bice
Karen Bice

Hi Neicole. Interesting post. I'm a fan of Triberr and maybe it's because I'm not blogging (maybe someday soon) and I'm not in marketing. I really enjoyed seeing the different Triberr tweets for so many bloggers I wouldn't have known about without Triberr. Now, I'm assuming because of the option to not auto post the tweets, I don't see any Triberr related tweets. My stream feels really boring now, and most non-Triberr tweets being constantly shared are plain boring. I estimate at least 80% of tweeters could hold back 80% of their tweets in the interest of not boring their audience to death. I mean, how many times can a subject be regurgitated to death? Like I said, interesting post. :)

PeterMasters
PeterMasters

@crumpyliciousblog I can see your point and fair comment, no one with a good sized following does or would even want to read every Tweet.

On that very subject, Subjot has come up with a great Twitter alternative, where you follow individuals particular subjects rather than just individuals. A simple but inspired idea and even thought it's currently in private beta, it's getting some good press.

Back to Triberr, I believe that triberr's analytics show how many retweets people receive and therefore, if someone's post never received any it would indicate the posts were no good, irrelevant or they were just in the wrong tribe.

To me Triberr is a great marketing tool.

Best regards, thanks for the post, Peter

Dino Dogan
Dino Dogan

Hi Niall, That is a valid concern and one that we have addressed to the fullest.

Dino Dogan
Dino Dogan

Hi Niall,

That is a valid concern and one that we have addressed to the fullest.

Dino Dogan
Dino Dogan

Hi Niall,

That is a valid concern and one that we have addressed to the fullest.

Neicole Crepeau
Neicole Crepeau

Another new app to check out. I'll take a look. Thanks!

Neicole Crepeau
Neicole Crepeau

Another new app to check out. I'll take a look. Thanks!

Neicole Crepeau
Neicole Crepeau

Thank you, again, Danny for giving me the opportunity and providing such an awesome forum for discussion!

Neicole Crepeau
Neicole Crepeau

Thank you, again, Danny for giving me the opportunity and providing such an awesome forum for discussion!

Neicole Crepeau
Neicole Crepeau

That's interesting. Dino and Dan may want to take note. So, you're seeing less Triberr tweets recently?

I'm with you on the 80%!

Neicole Crepeau
Neicole Crepeau

That's interesting. Dino and Dan may want to take note. So, you're seeing less Triberr tweets recently?

I'm with you on the 80%!

Neicole Crepeau
Neicole Crepeau

That's interesting. Dino and Dan may want to take note. So, you're seeing less Triberr tweets recently? I'm with you on the 80%!

crumpyliciousblog
crumpyliciousblog

Thanks for the info. Will check those out and see if I can utilize them.=)

Karen Bice
Karen Bice

Yes, I think it was last week that I noticed I wasn't seeing Triberr tweets. But I check my twitter stream periodically throughout day, and only for a couple of minutes, and I don't do a search for them, which maybe I should. I try to get on at night for an hour or so and I used to see Triberr tweets a lot then, which was a good time for me to check them out. Thanks, Neicole.

Karen Bice
Karen Bice

Yes, I think it was last week that I noticed I wasn't seeing Triberr tweets. But I check my twitter stream periodically throughout day, and only for a couple of minutes, and I don't do a search for them, which maybe I should. I try to get on at night for an hour or so and I used to see Triberr tweets a lot then, which was a good time for me to check them out. Thanks, Neicole.

Dan Cristo
Dan Cristo

It used to be easy to search for triberr sent tweets, you just did a search for, "tribr.it" and you could see all the latest tweets. Maybe a month back we switched over the shortener to a handful of random ones so that we could use tribr.it for something else.

Lucky for you, we're working on ways to bring that tweet goodness to the surface. So for example, if you wanted to see the most recent or most popular tweets on triberr you'll soon be able to see them on the homepage, and if you want a specific tribe, just go to that tribe page.

Give us, say... two weeks, and that stuff should be in place.

Dan Cristo
Dan Cristo

It used to be easy to search for triberr sent tweets, you just did a search for, "tribr.it" and you could see all the latest tweets. Maybe a month back we switched over the shortener to a handful of random ones so that we could use tribr.it for something else.

Lucky for you, we're working on ways to bring that tweet goodness to the surface. So for example, if you wanted to see the most recent or most popular tweets on triberr you'll soon be able to see them on the homepage, and if you want a specific tribe, just go to that tribe page.

Give us, say... two weeks, and that stuff should be in place.

Dan Cristo
Dan Cristo

It used to be easy to search for triberr sent tweets, you just did a search for, "tribr.it" and you could see all the latest tweets. Maybe a month back we switched over the shortener to a handful of random ones so that we could use tribr.it for something else. Lucky for you, we're working on ways to bring that tweet goodness to the surface. So for example, if you wanted to see the most recent or most popular tweets on triberr you'll soon be able to see them on the homepage, and if you want a specific tribe, just go to that tribe page. Give us, say... two weeks, and that stuff should be in place.

Trackbacks

  1. [...] Why I’m Hesitant About Triberr originally appeared on Danny Brown | Social Media Marketing Blog – The Human Side of Media and the Social Side of Marketing under a Creative Commons license.   If you enjoyed this article, please consider sharing it! [...]

  2. [...] to a direct comment made via a Tweet or a comment on a blog post (see Neicole Crepeau’s guest post on Danny Brown’s blog) Dino and Dan are present, civil, courteous and [...]

  3. [...] other day I saw this excellent piece about Triberr by Neicole Crepeau on Danny Brown’s blog. Now of course I can see the advantage [...]

  4. [...] know some like Neicole Crepeau are still reluctant and I completly understand. They want to read and vet all the content which [...]

  5. [...] read a couple of posts, one hesitant about Triberr and one in favor of [...]

  6. [...] asleep, let me help you with some archived conversations on a variety of blogs. Some love Triberr, some don’t; others flip-flop and go back and still others are on the fence. This post really has nothing to do [...]

  7. [...] Neicole Crepeau commented below, and shared that she wrote a very similar guest post on Danny Brown’s blog. Check it out (including the [...]

  8. [...] earned the label of the anti-Triberr lady. It originated from my post on Danny Brown’s blog, Why I’m Hesitant About Triberr. It surprised me, as I was very careful with the title and the content of that post, to avoid [...]

  9. [...] criticism struck me as such a contrast to the response I received from the Triberr guys to a blog post here on Danny’s blog. In that case, I actually did criticize a feature of their [...]

  10. [...] you around Triberr and teaching you on how to use it, as this was done countless times by other respectful [...]

  11. [...] has been written about Triberr — whether automated tweets being shared by a “tribe” are a good thing, whether it can be gamed, and so on. When Gini Dietrich invited me into my first tribe, I had [...]

  12. [...] Why I’m Hesitant About Triberr by Neicole Crepeau (@neicolec) [...]

  13. [...] Why I’m Hesitant About Triberr by Neicole Crepeau (@neicolec) [...]

  14. [...] Why I’m Hesitant About Triberr by Neicole Crepeau (@neicolec) [...]