Paragliding Over Waimanalo Bay

This is a guest post by Geoff Livingston.

The ongoing conversation about the ills of the A-List produces the opposite effect than desired. Instead of creating a correction, it builds a stratosphere of influence, and creates a perception of unworthiness for the rest of the social web. This demeans the value of everyone else — literally everyone who is not a top ranked “A-Lister,” a crying shame consider that the rest of the population has as much of a chance of becoming truly useful and influential.

In some ways the “A-List” conversation is fostered by leaderboard systems of top bloggers (Ad Age 150, Technorati) and influencers (Klout, Empire Avenue). It is perpetuated by insider chatter and a corresponding attitude of eliteness from the top tier (perceived or real). This type of influence is popularity driven.

Welcome to the Fifth Estate (yes, I just shamelessly pimped my new book) concludes with a discussion about influence over the long-term. Here’s the truth about influence: It is highly subjective, and shifts with the topic, time, situation and community. Further, leaderboard influencers are not likely to create groundswells of actions. Usually, this type of influencer is a content creator or social network personality — the dog that barks the loudest. When it comes to real action, most of them can’t bite.

Influence and Individualism

Twenty years ago, the equivalent would be to dub a TV star as extremely powerful. Can you imagine Donald Trump winning the presidency of the United States based on the popularity of his TV show, “The Apprentice?” As bad of a job that our elected officials do, indoctrinating a media personality into the profession of governance would likely create much more damage than reform.

That’s why the conversation about the A-List seems fruitless and harmful. It invests time and gives influence to people who can’t accomplish things. Further, the cost of personal equity and a lesser perception of position is harmful. That makes no sense. We should be focusing on moving the needle of progress forward. The reality is that every single person has an opportunity to become influential with their community of interest.

Real influencers are awarded their position for doing great things. They are activists like Stacey Monk, or builders of new technologies such as Anil Dash. They provide real new perspectives to online media like analytics whiz Avinash Kaushik or change the business forever with new thought, like Charlene Li and her still noteworthy book, Groundswell.

These people actually do things. Their influence was a result of achievement. It may wane if they don’t continue doing great things, but in the end, this type of influence is admirable, things that people remember for decades.

Doesn’t it make more sense to talk about the noteworthy influencer instead of the narcissistic A-List? Aren’t the noteworthy successes the ones we aspire to emulate? Which can you learn from, who will make you and your efforts better?

Five Tips to Stop Supporting “A-Listers”

Ultimately, someone is only influential if they are given that influence by their community. If you don’t believe in the A-List’s influence, here are five ways to separate yourself from the conversation.

1) Don’t link to them. Linking above all else helps support their “top tier” positioning. Instead, link to people whose conversation challenges you and provokes the forward motion you are seeking.

2) Give up trying to converse with them. Why try to have a relationship with someone who is not there? Instead focus on those who do participate.

3) Don’t talk about them. Talking about them as unfit leaders still leaves them in a leadership position. This is leadership by perception. Move on, or if you do talk about them, do so in a peer-to-peer fashion. Everyone puts their pants on one leg at a time.

4) Unfollow and unsubscribe from them. If they and their behavior really upsets you, this is an act of self-preservation. Your online time will become exponentially more enjoyable.

5) Stop wasting your time on them. This above all is the most freeing of the tips. When you realize that this A-List conversation has become an energy suck, a waste of your time that is holding you back, you can reprioritize on something meaningful, for example, Danny’s 12 for 12K Challenge, or your own efforts for business, social good, or personal development.

This is mindful and good in its own right. Rather than fighting, you have moved on. Pursue new horizons.

What do you think about the continuing A-List conversation?

About the Author: Geoff Livingston is the co-founder of Zoetica, helping non-profits and socially responsible companies connect with their audience. He’s also the author of Welcome to the Fifth Estate and Now is Gone. You can read more on Geoff’s blog or connect with him on Twitter at @geoffliving.

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167 comments
Ari Herzog
Ari Herzog

On target, thejackb. You're right there are too many variables. For every dannybrown there is a bean0646 and each Brown is in my A list. Is my A list different than your A list? You bet! My latest conversation: http://ariherzog.com/about-ari/

Brankica
Brankica

I have recently read somewhere, maybe it was a blog post or something, about how those A-listers are only A-listers for a handful of bloggers. And that is true. Who, outside of this small circle of blogs we all live in, knows about those people!?

I found it very interesting to learn that I am doing great according to your 5 point list. I am not linking to them, following them or talking about them. Honestly, I learn so much more somewhere else.

I respect their success and wish the same for all of us, but a lot of beginners (and unfortunately those who aren't so green) tend to look at what the A-listers do and try to copy everything.

You end up with lousy blogs that fail pretty fast.

Anyway, just wanted to say that I completely agree with you, Goeff.

I understand most of the comments here. But I also know of some people that are against your opinion here, that base their commenting habits by "I can attach a comluv link and get a dofollow link" compared to "I will not comment on Disqus blogs". Those are the people that will always "defend" A-listers no matter what they do, because that is what they read on their blogs "You must comment like crazy and get links from dofollow blogs".

Seriously????

Anyway, Danny is far better than what most of see as A-listers. He is a list of his own and a genuine person above all!

Brankica
Brankica

I have recently read somewhere, maybe it was a blog post or something, about how those A-listers are only A-listers for a handful of bloggers. And that is true. Who, outside of this small circle of blogs we all live in, knows about those people!?

I found it very interesting to learn that I am doing great according to your 5 point list. I am not linking to them, following them or talking about them. Honestly, I learn so much more somewhere else.

I respect their success and wish the same for all of us, but a lot of beginners (and unfortunately those who aren't so green) tend to look at what the A-listers do and try to copy everything.

You end up with lousy blogs that fail pretty fast.

Anyway, just wanted to say that I completely agree with you, Goeff.

I understand most of the comments here. But I also know of some people that are against your opinion here, that base their commenting habits by "I can attach a comluv link and get a dofollow link" compared to "I will not comment on Disqus blogs". Those are the people that will always "defend" A-listers no matter what they do, because that is what they read on their blogs "You must comment like crazy and get links from dofollow blogs".

Seriously????

Anyway, Danny is far better than what most of see as A-listers. He is a list of his own and a genuine person above all!

Brankica
Brankica

I have recently read somewhere, maybe it was a blog post or something, about how those A-listers are only A-listers for a handful of bloggers. And that is true. Who, outside of this small circle of blogs we all live in, knows about those people!? I found it very interesting to learn that I am doing great according to your 5 point list. I am not linking to them, following them or talking about them. Honestly, I learn so much more somewhere else. I respect their success and wish the same for all of us, but a lot of beginners (and unfortunately those who aren't so green) tend to look at what the A-listers do and try to copy everything. You end up with lousy blogs that fail pretty fast. Anyway, just wanted to say that I completely agree with you, Goeff. I understand most of the comments here. But I also know of some people that are against your opinion here, that base their commenting habits by "I can attach a comluv link and get a dofollow link" compared to "I will not comment on Disqus blogs". Those are the people that will always "defend" A-listers no matter what they do, because that is what they read on their blogs "You must comment like crazy and get links from dofollow blogs". Seriously???? Anyway, Danny is far better than what most of see as A-listers. He is a list of his own and a genuine person above all!

Michael Schechter
Michael Schechter

I'm a bit late to the party and thanks so much for the link, Geoff. I think your comment on my post was so spot on about it being two schools rather than two classes. A-list is probably an incorrect term as folks like you, Gini and Danny are already there. Seems to be that at one point everyone was walking and talking the talk. Now there are those that are talking it and those that still
manage to do both...

It is coming down to a matter of those who care about the klout they have vs. those that just have it...

I still think it is a matter of being a little lost rather than doing something wrong or bad and leave a little bit of hope that there is still room for those who care about all the status to come down to earth a little bit... (read: a lot a bit...)

Michael Schechter
Michael Schechter

I'm a bit late to the party and thanks so much for the link, Geoff. I think your comment on my post was so spot on about it being two schools rather than two classes. A-list is probably an incorrect term as folks like you, Gini and Danny are already there. Seems to be that at one point everyone was walking and talking the talk. Now there are those that are talking it and those that still
manage to do both...

It is coming down to a matter of those who care about the klout they have vs. those that just have it...

I still think it is a matter of being a little lost rather than doing something wrong or bad and leave a little bit of hope that there is still room for those who care about all the status to come down to earth a little bit... (read: a lot a bit...)

Michael Schechter
Michael Schechter

I'm a bit late to the party and thanks so much for the link, Geoff. I think your comment on my post was so spot on about it being two schools rather than two classes. A-list is probably an incorrect term as folks like you, Gini and Danny are already there. Seems to be that at one point everyone was walking and talking the talk. Now there are those that are talking it and those that still manage to do both... It is coming down to a matter of those who care about the klout they have vs. those that just have it... I still think it is a matter of being a little lost rather than doing something wrong or bad and leave a little bit of hope that there is still room for those who care about all the status to come down to earth a little bit... (read: a lot a bit...)

Chris Eh Young
Chris Eh Young

People will always pander to A-listers. There is no easier way to get mileage from a blog post than to mention a handful of high follow count people and then let them spread it for you. It's essentially using marketers to do the marketing for you.

The result is a spike in followers and perhaps a rank up in social popularity. It's a great way for Z-listers to run perhaps as high as the B-list.

But then again, what do I know?

Alex Aguilar
Alex Aguilar

This is the sad truth right here; this is the reason why people will keep courting A-listers. Getting an A-lister to even peripherally acknowledge an aspiring blogger will immediately result in a huge boost of followers/readers. I share Geoff's sympathies and wish it weren’t the case, but that's the reality right now. The star bloggers will stay on top while the rest of us fight for their breadcrumbs.

Chris Eh Young
Chris Eh Young

People will always pander to A-listers. There is no easier way to get mileage from a blog post than to mention a handful of high follow count people and then let them spread it for you. It's essentially using marketers to do the marketing for you. The result is a spike in followers and perhaps a rank up in social popularity. It's a great way for Z-listers to run perhaps as high as the B-list. But then again, what do I know?

Alex Aguilar
Alex Aguilar

This is the sad truth right here; this is the reason why people will keep courting A-listers. Getting an A-lister to even peripherally acknowledge an aspiring blogger will immediately result in a huge boost of followers/readers. I share Geoff's sympathies and wish it weren’t the case, but that's the reality right now. The star bloggers will stay on top while the rest of us fight for their breadcrumbs.

Sonali Joshi
Sonali Joshi

Remaining relevant for bloggers is a serious challenge, and I sense some may not realize that yet.

Sonali Joshi
Sonali Joshi

Remaining relevant for bloggers is a serious challenge, and I sense some may not realize that yet.

Kneale Mann
Kneale Mann

Great post, Geoff and bang on. It's interesting to find out how "a-list" someone is when you're in a packed restaurant of real people and ask if anyone has heard of ________. Sad to say, the response isn't so favorable. We live in a digital bubble, we need to help companies and organizations. We need to point our focus on making a difference not another point on the Klout tote board.

It really has nothing to do with numbers and I often wonder what the social web would be like without all the stupid counters.

Let's get out of our thimble and join the rest of the humans.

Kneale Mann
Kneale Mann

Great post, Geoff and bang on. It's interesting to find out how "a-list" someone is when you're in a packed restaurant of real people and ask if anyone has heard of ________. Sad to say, the response isn't so favorable. We live in a digital bubble, we need to help companies and organizations. We need to point our focus on making a difference not another point on the Klout tote board.

It really has nothing to do with numbers and I often wonder what the social web would be like without all the stupid counters.

Let's get out of our thimble and join the rest of the humans.

Kneale Mann
Kneale Mann

Great post, Geoff and bang on. It's interesting to find out how "a-list" someone is when you're in a packed restaurant of real people and ask if anyone has heard of ________. Sad to say, the response isn't so favorable. We live in a digital bubble, we need to help companies and organizations. We need to point our focus on making a difference not another point on the Klout tote board. It really has nothing to do with numbers and I often wonder what the social web would be like without all the stupid counters. Let's get out of our thimble and join the rest of the humans.

Mitch Mitchell
Mitch Mitchell

Since I'm going to take an alternative view here I'm glad it's not Danny that wrote this post.

I think what you wrote here is a knee jerk reaction to the issue. So people stop linking to and talking to and talking about the folks now considered A-listers. Who do they then designate as the next person they follow, and then what happens if that person becomes the next A-lister, stop following them as well?

It sounds like ultimate hate for A-listers, and it reminds me of an interesting debate I've been having lately with someone else regarding the concepts of wealth and why some people are vilified just because they happened to have figured out how to be wealthy.

Frankly, I don't like this direction. At least have a good reason to hate someone that might be an A-lister. For what it's worth, the guy whose blog this was posted on is considered an A-lister by a lot of people (though Danny would want to defer from that); do we stop following Danny because someone has decided to put him on that pedestal?

It may seem strange that someone like me would take this position after writing the article that I'm linking to here through CommentLuv but the reasons are much different and the outcomes wished for are different as well. If people really hate A-listers just because someone called them that, then they're going to do everything they can do to avoid ever becoming an A-lister. If that's the case then you might as well stop writing your blog now if you have one because no one ever wants to become what they don't like. Luckily, in this case I have no such qualms.

Geoff Livingston
Geoff Livingston

Mmm, no, it's not a reaction. It's a response. Actually I took these steps myself last winter, and have been colleagues with many of these top bloggers before they got big over the past five years. So while you may not like the direction, it's worked for me and helped me to enjoy blogging again.

And yes, while Danny is a a great blogger, his feet are on the ground. But I won't call him an "A-Lister," he is better than that.

Cheers.

Mitch Mitchell
Mitch Mitchell

Since I'm going to take an alternative view here I'm glad it's not Danny that wrote this post.

I think what you wrote here is a knee jerk reaction to the issue. So people stop linking to and talking to and talking about the folks now considered A-listers. Who do they then designate as the next person they follow, and then what happens if that person becomes the next A-lister, stop following them as well?

It sounds like ultimate hate for A-listers, and it reminds me of an interesting debate I've been having lately with someone else regarding the concepts of wealth and why some people are vilified just because they happened to have figured out how to be wealthy.

Frankly, I don't like this direction. At least have a good reason to hate someone that might be an A-lister. For what it's worth, the guy whose blog this was posted on is considered an A-lister by a lot of people (though Danny would want to defer from that); do we stop following Danny because someone has decided to put him on that pedestal?

It may seem strange that someone like me would take this position after writing the article that I'm linking to here through CommentLuv but the reasons are much different and the outcomes wished for are different as well. If people really hate A-listers just because someone called them that, then they're going to do everything they can do to avoid ever becoming an A-lister. If that's the case then you might as well stop writing your blog now if you have one because no one ever wants to become what they don't like. Luckily, in this case I have no such qualms.

Geoff Livingston
Geoff Livingston

Mmm, no, it's not a reaction. It's a response. Actually I took these steps myself last winter, and have been colleagues with many of these top bloggers before they got big over the past five years. So while you may not like the direction, it's worked for me and helped me to enjoy blogging again.

And yes, while Danny is a a great blogger, his feet are on the ground. But I won't call him an "A-Lister," he is better than that.

Cheers.

Marcus Sheridan-The Sales Lion
Marcus Sheridan-The Sales Lion

I must admit Geoff, I've really enjoyed reading this article and the subsequent responses. Although I could literally argue for and against the subject herein, I just want to say I'm impressed with your hard-nosed approach. You don't back down easily, and I respect that.

Cheers mate,

Marcus

(PS: avatars with hairy animal faces rock)

Mitch Mitchell
Mitch Mitchell

Since I'm going to take an alternative view here I'm glad it's not Danny that wrote this post. I think what you wrote here is a knee jerk reaction to the issue. So people stop linking to and talking to and talking about the folks now considered A-listers. Who do they then designate as the next person they follow, and then what happens if that person becomes the next A-lister, stop following them as well? It sounds like ultimate hate for A-listers, and it reminds me of an interesting debate I've been having lately with someone else regarding the concepts of wealth and why some people are vilified just because they happened to have figured out how to be wealthy. Frankly, I don't like this direction. At least have a good reason to hate someone that might be an A-lister. For what it's worth, the guy whose blog this was posted on is considered an A-lister by a lot of people (though Danny would want to defer from that); do we stop following Danny because someone has decided to put him on that pedestal? It may seem strange that someone like me would take this position after writing the article that I'm linking to here through CommentLuv but the reasons are much different and the outcomes wished for are different as well. If people really hate A-listers just because someone called them that, then they're going to do everything they can do to avoid ever becoming an A-lister. If that's the case then you might as well stop writing your blog now if you have one because no one ever wants to become what they don't like. Luckily, in this case I have no such qualms.

Geoff Livingston
Geoff Livingston

Mmm, no, it's not a reaction. It's a response. Actually I took these steps myself last winter, and have been colleagues with many of these top bloggers before they got big over the past five years. So while you may not like the direction, it's worked for me and helped me to enjoy blogging again. And yes, while Danny is a a great blogger, his feet are on the ground. But I won't call him an "A-Lister," he is better than that. Cheers.

Marcus Sheridan-The Sales Lion
Marcus Sheridan-The Sales Lion

I must admit Geoff, I've really enjoyed reading this article and the subsequent responses. Although I could literally argue for and against the subject herein, I just want to say I'm impressed with your hard-nosed approach. You don't back down easily, and I respect that. Cheers mate, Marcus (PS: avatars with hairy animal faces rock)

Steven De Costa
Steven De Costa

You can't destroy the A-List, whoever they may be. Avoiding them and remaining focused on your own profile, relationships and goals is certainly good advice.
However, the self is defined in the reflection of others so it helps to have ready access to a group of popular influencers to rebel against :)

Steven De Costa
Steven De Costa

You can't destroy the A-List, whoever they may be. Avoiding them and remaining focused on your own profile, relationships and goals is certainly good advice. However, the self is defined in the reflection of others so it helps to have ready access to a group of popular influencers to rebel against :)

leon Noone
leon Noone

G'Day Geoff,
I've been writing for about 50 years. I never go to "Writers Weeks" or "Writers Festivals." It's not that I don't think that I could learn anything. I'm sure I could.

But I couldn't cope with all that overbearing intensity of writers and would-be writers discussing writing as if it talking about it would make you better at it. You learn to write by writing.

I'm a relative newbie in the so-called blogosphere. But I detect some of the same wheel spinning and navel gazing might, just might be evident here.

Being read by 1,000,000 people is an extraordinaily exciting prospect. But if none of them are in my target market, that's all it is.

"You like A-list and I like A-list" But, as the old song says, maybe it's time to "call the whole thing off"

Make sure you have fun

Regards

Leon

leon Noone
leon Noone

G'Day Geoff,
I've been writing for about 50 years. I never go to "Writers Weeks" or "Writers Festivals." It's not that I don't think that I could learn anything. I'm sure I could.

But I couldn't cope with all that overbearing intensity of writers and would-be writers discussing writing as if it talking about it would make you better at it. You learn to write by writing.

I'm a relative newbie in the so-called blogosphere. But I detect some of the same wheel spinning and navel gazing might, just might be evident here.

Being read by 1,000,000 people is an extraordinaily exciting prospect. But if none of them are in my target market, that's all it is.

"You like A-list and I like A-list" But, as the old song says, maybe it's time to "call the whole thing off"

Make sure you have fun

Regards

Leon

leon Noone
leon Noone

G'Day Geoff, I've been writing for about 50 years. I never go to "Writers Weeks" or "Writers Festivals." It's not that I don't think that I could learn anything. I'm sure I could. But I couldn't cope with all that overbearing intensity of writers and would-be writers discussing writing as if it talking about it would make you better at it. You learn to write by writing. I'm a relative newbie in the so-called blogosphere. But I detect some of the same wheel spinning and navel gazing might, just might be evident here. Being read by 1,000,000 people is an extraordinaily exciting prospect. But if none of them are in my target market, that's all it is. "You like A-list and I like A-list" But, as the old song says, maybe it's time to "call the whole thing off" Make sure you have fun Regards Leon

Stephen Strepsi
Stephen Strepsi

Geoff,
Some nice points here.
Just one quibble, particularly with someone pimping his writing: "eliteness"?

The actual English word is "elitism".

Geoff Livingston
Geoff Livingston

Eats, shoots and leaves for you! Thanks, I'll try to remember next time.

Stephen Strepsi
Stephen Strepsi

Geoff,
Some nice points here.
Just one quibble, particularly with someone pimping his writing: "eliteness"?

The actual English word is "elitism".

Geoff Livingston
Geoff Livingston

Eats, shoots and leaves for you! Thanks, I'll try to remember next time.

Stephen Strepsi
Stephen Strepsi

Geoff, Some nice points here. Just one quibble, particularly with someone pimping his writing: "eliteness"? The actual English word is "elitism".

Geoff Livingston
Geoff Livingston

Eats, shoots and leaves for you! Thanks, I'll try to remember next time.

Jack@TheJackB
Jack@TheJackB

I haven't ever subscribed to the belief that there is an A-List. There are too many variables to and factors at play and I am not interested in building consensus on who is or isn't.

In many ways blogging is no different from our school days. Some bloggers are popular for reasons that are hard to fathom and or don't make sense. It is a waste of time to worry about it.

Power and influence in social media is derived from whether people respond to your call to action. The only thing I worry about is whether my community responds to my requests.

Jack@TheJackB
Jack@TheJackB

I haven't ever subscribed to the belief that there is an A-List. There are too many variables to and factors at play and I am not interested in building consensus on who is or isn't. In many ways blogging is no different from our school days. Some bloggers are popular for reasons that are hard to fathom and or don't make sense. It is a waste of time to worry about it. Power and influence in social media is derived from whether people respond to your call to action. The only thing I worry about is whether my community responds to my requests.

Srinivas Rao
Srinivas Rao

GEoff,

It's funny because I was thinking of writing a post on nearly the same subject. These days I rarely read the blogs of the so-called "a-list" because I find that it is really hard to develop relationships with them. I also love that new bloggers com to the table with fresh ideas and as a result I've embraced something Stan Smith at Pushing Social said "kiss lots of digital babies." Many of the a-list blogs these days are not even written by the person who started the blog, so the value has diminished in my opinion.

Geoff Livingston
Geoff Livingston

I, too, am ruthless with my reader. I agree. Remaining relevant for bloggers is a serious challenge, and I sense some may not realize that yet.

Srinivas Rao
Srinivas Rao

GEoff,

It's funny because I was thinking of writing a post on nearly the same subject. These days I rarely read the blogs of the so-called "a-list" because I find that it is really hard to develop relationships with them. I also love that new bloggers com to the table with fresh ideas and as a result I've embraced something Stan Smith at Pushing Social said "kiss lots of digital babies." Many of the a-list blogs these days are not even written by the person who started the blog, so the value has diminished in my opinion.

Marcus Sheridan-The Sales Lion
Marcus Sheridan-The Sales Lion

'Really hard to develop relationships with them'...kinda the understatement of the century there Srini ;-) But you're exactly right man, and not to keep lauding Gini and Danny, but that's what impresses me about them so much-- they have an approach to others as a brand new blogger would have--- welcoming anyone who wants to eat at the table.

Geoff Livingston
Geoff Livingston

I, too, am ruthless with my reader. I agree. Remaining relevant for bloggers is a serious challenge, and I sense some may not realize that yet.

Srinivas Rao
Srinivas Rao

GEoff, It's funny because I was thinking of writing a post on nearly the same subject. These days I rarely read the blogs of the so-called "a-list" because I find that it is really hard to develop relationships with them. I also love that new bloggers com to the table with fresh ideas and as a result I've embraced something Stan Smith at Pushing Social said "kiss lots of digital babies." Many of the a-list blogs these days are not even written by the person who started the blog, so the value has diminished in my opinion.

Marcus Sheridan-The Sales Lion
Marcus Sheridan-The Sales Lion

'Really hard to develop relationships with them'...kinda the understatement of the century there Srini ;-) But you're exactly right man, and not to keep lauding Gini and Danny, but that's what impresses me about them so much-- they have an approach to others as a brand new blogger would have--- welcoming anyone who wants to eat at the table.

Geoff Livingston
Geoff Livingston

I, too, am ruthless with my reader. I agree. Remaining relevant for bloggers is a serious challenge, and I sense some may not realize that yet.

Davina K. Brewer
Davina K. Brewer

Tempted to not RT this, so I don't carry on the conversation Geoff. ;-) And I totally agree that if you don't like or whine about your community all the time, get out - and find a new one. Also will 2nd and 3rd all the comments about finding and defining our own "THIS is what matters to me, THESE are the people I like" lists. Word.

Now a nitpick: dismissing an otherwise helpful, quality post because it came from a so-called A lister... is it not the same as ignoring one just b/c from the likes of someone like myself? Ditto a tweet or RT. Don't misunderstand me, I have been giving the unfollow button a healthy workout of late and yet, plenty of folks who may not use MY style of engagement are still there, still get a look in the reader once in a while. I have some respect different, smart ideas that aren't always in sync with my own, keep an eye out for various points of view - keeps me honest. I'm not courting anyone's favor, I don't subscribe to the gospel according to anyone.. I just think if something has value to it, I'll use it in a link or RT and not let whatever 'list' someone's on take up so much of my time. FWIW.

Geoff Livingston
Geoff Livingston

I hear you, but in some cases I have simply stopped listening. I can't help myself. It's too painful to give them the time of day anymore.

Davina K. Brewer
Davina K. Brewer

I hear you right back.. and in some cases, I barely started listening as I wasn't all that impressed in the first place. Now I'd be lying if I said I didn't notice if I was 'ignored' in some circles but then not sure what I've done to get 'noticed' either. Whatever.. think maybe that is what's not worth the time of day, the worrying or noticing the popularity contest. Thanks.

Davina K. Brewer
Davina K. Brewer

Tempted to not RT this, so I don't carry on the conversation Geoff. ;-) And I totally agree that if you don't like or whine about your community all the time, get out - and find a new one. Also will 2nd and 3rd all the comments about finding and defining our own "THIS is what matters to me, THESE are the people I like" lists. Word. Now a nitpick: dismissing an otherwise helpful, quality post because it came from a so-called A lister... is it not the same as ignoring one just b/c from the likes of someone like myself? Ditto a tweet or RT. Don't misunderstand me, I have been giving the unfollow button a healthy workout of late and yet, plenty of folks who may not use MY style of engagement are still there, still get a look in the reader once in a while. I have some respect different, smart ideas that aren't always in sync with my own, keep an eye out for various points of view - keeps me honest. I'm not courting anyone's favor, I don't subscribe to the gospel according to anyone.. I just think if something has value to it, I'll use it in a link or RT and not let whatever 'list' someone's on take up so much of my time. FWIW.

Geoff Livingston
Geoff Livingston

I hear you, but in some cases I have simply stopped listening. I can't help myself. It's too painful to give them the time of day anymore.

Davina K. Brewer
Davina K. Brewer

I hear you right back.. and in some cases, I barely started listening as I wasn't all that impressed in the first place. Now I'd be lying if I said I didn't notice if I was 'ignored' in some circles but then not sure what I've done to get 'noticed' either. Whatever.. think maybe that is what's not worth the time of day, the worrying or noticing the popularity contest. Thanks.

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  1. [...] the Social Media elite? Well, just about anything, as Geoff Livingston notes. Most importantly, people could exert more energy towards trying to influence others rather than trying to get on the r…. And who are these A-listers, anyway? A thought-provoking [...]