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Engagement from Scratch by Danny InyThe following post is an excerpt from my chapter in Danny Iny’s new book, Engagement From Scratch: How Super Community Builders Create a Loyal Audience and How You Can Do the Same.

It features lessons in community building and content marketing from the likes of Guy Kawasaki, Brian Clark, Mitch Joel, Kristi Hines, Gini Dietrich and many more. A review of the book will appear later this week.

I Would Have Posted Less Frequently

I started off writing a blog post a day (and sometimes I posted more than once on the same day). Sometimes this made me publish stuff that, in hindsight, could have (should have) been better.

In the middle of 2011, I made a conscious decision to post less frequently, and really ask questions of things in the stuff I wrote about. It made me a better blogger, and resulted in the ensuing comments going through the roof.

I Would Have Been More Honest

Let me rephrase that: I would not have been afraid to speak more honestly. There were times early on when I wouldn’t have said anything negative about certain people, since I (incorrectly) thought they were right. Turns out we all get blinded by vacuous respect. When I realized this, and began writing openly about bad practices and calling out bullshit, it once again raised the level of engagement through the roof, as others were clearly thinking the same thing. Be honest, and you’ll have engagement.

I Wouldn’t Be So Closed Off

One of the things many bloggers complain about is that social sites like Twitter and Facebook have seen comment numbers decrease, as conversations about a post shift there, as opposed to taking part on the blog. Heck, I even wrote a post about Twitter killing blog comments! But that’s missing the point – engagement comes in all shapes and sizes, and while your blog may be the most desired place for discussion, true engagement allows the discussion to expand in all directions.

If I was to do anything differently, it’d be to get active on Facebook sooner (and now Google+). Because, ironically, I’ve tended to find that the more willing I am to converse away from my blog, the more likely people are to click through and read more of my stuff. And that’s a win-win for everyone.

Engagement From Scratch: How Super Community Builders Create a Loyal Audience and How You Can Do the Same is available now. 50% of all profits from book sales go to support the teaching of entrepreneurship.

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83 Comments on "Three Things I Would Have Done Differently If I Started Blogging Today"


The Enormous Post-Launch Best of the Web | Firepole Marketing Blog
1 year 6 months ago

[…] Three Things I Would Have Done Differently If I Started Blogging Today (Danny Brown) […]

Michael | BuildinganOnline.com
3 years 2 months ago

Hi Danny.

Happy New Year to you and yours.

Wow, with all the activity you have on just a single article, I can see the commitment one have, if one dare to make a comment.

I think, it makes much sense not to write just to write, and your decision to promote quality rather than the quantity, I can fully endorse.

Now I do not know, how many visitors you had back in mid 2011, but for a new blog like mine, with very few daily visitors (yet), I think it would be devastating not to be highly active.

Of course, the quality has to be okay, otherwise you cheat your visitors – and yourself – and they will not return.

But a new blog is forced to build a loyal readership, and I do not think you can do so on the Internet, if you do not stick to.

You have a big ‘fan club’ here, so you can allow yourself to cut down on your input.

And I also believe, that your honesty is precisely what has created your ‘fan club’. People in this industry is tired to infinitely of being filled with frivolities or even outright lies.

Personally, I prefer people like you, who dare to have their opinions and say them out loud. And then it does not matter whether I agree or not, as long as they do not just shut out all criticism, if I do not.

Regards,
Michael

Janeth
3 years 3 months ago

I am still trying to figure out what I want to write about and how you are able to be yourself when you write. ):

Ricardo Bueno
3 years 3 months ago

I’m posting (almost) daily on our company blog. Lately, I’m finding that a tad bit difficult, so I’m writing shorter posts. Still, I’m thinking about spacing them out to say 2-3 per week but longer, and meatier posts.

Anyway, I think a commitment to quality is better than a vague commitment to a certain number of posts (if that makes sense). So that’s what I’m going for…

dj münchen
3 years 3 months ago

thanks for your experience and sharing !

markaylward
3 years 3 months ago

Hey Danny

I couldn’t agree more. I just started a post about this topic of being “real” versus posting what you think people might like. It’s so obvious in hindsight that you want to kick yourself for not realizing sooner that people really want to hear your “honest” opinion. Those are usually funnier anyway:)

Mark

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@markaylward It’s just one of the things I love about blogging, mate, the fluidity. If something’s not working, or you feel you’re becoming stale, you change on the fly. Try doing that when you’re writing a book under deadline. ;-)

bdorman264
3 years 3 months ago

I started with one post a week and will probably start tapering off from there……..actually, and even though it might not look like it yet, I am not sticking with a schedule. I’m trying to write and post when inspiration strikes and not plug it into a certain day ‘just because’.

Good advice indeed and I’m sure it is a great book based on the people you have mentioned.

Hope all is well, and thanks for sharing this.

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@bdorman264 I’m such a dumbass, mate – I was asking myself, “What book?”, and then I hit the A-ha moment… ;)

Going by the interaction and community over at your place, mate, I’d say you’re doing pretty well in your approach as is. Si? ;-)

bdorman264
3 years 3 months ago

@DannyBrown It certainly exceeded my expectations; I tried to take care of some of the basics early and that was getting to know the people I had decided to engage with. It seems to have been a good model for me.

Nah, you’re still the smartest guy I know next to skypulsemedia

jasonkonopinski
3 years 3 months ago

The concept of an editorial calendar still eludes me. I’m admittedly wildly inconsistent at times with my posting frequency or even times when I post. If I wrap up a post on an evening, I’ll publish right then and there, promoting it via FB and Twitter several times throughout the day to keep the content buoyant. I’m a wee bit envious of @ginidietrich ability to crank out quality content day after day, not to mention the network of guest bloggers to fill the gaps.

#2 in particular resonates with me – and it’s something that I’ve noticed over the past year or so since I’ve been really active in the social space. But I’ll take it a step further: there seems to be a tendency for people get trapped by sharing & commenting on the same core group of blogs. I despise Triberr for this very reason because I see people crapping out the same old stuff and sharing it again and again and again. There was a time (even just a few months ago) when I was chomping at the bit to get into that inner circle of Triberr-ers for the traffic and reach bump but that’s no longer the case. And don’t get me started with Tweet Old Post. :)

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@jasonkonopinski@ginidietrich I have an Editorial Calendar in place over at Punk Views on Social Media, but I’ll be honest – it’s hardly used. Like you say mate, write while the iron’s hot – the best stuff always comes from that. ALWAYS.

Cheers, mate!

ginidietrich
3 years 3 months ago

@DannyBrown@jasonkonopinski We don’t have an editorial calendar, either. I have 52 drafts in my admin for those days I can’t think of anything to write about. But the advantage for blogging about the good and bad in the PR industry? You always have fodder (which is sometimes unfortunate).

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@ginidietrich@jasonkonopinski I have drafts for when Gini says something sensible. Never had to use them yet… ;-)

Ari Herzog
3 years 3 months ago

Running with your not wanting to be closed off, does that include accepting comments that may be construed as spam to some? If someone writes a genuine-appearing comment but with a name resembling “Executive Gifts” or “Toronto SEO,” would you accept the comment or mark it as spam today?

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@Ari Herzog It used to be. No more:

http://dannybrown.me/about-this-blog/comment-policy/

Want to be part of the community? Then *be* a part, don’t just partake.

Faissalhaithami
3 years 3 months ago

I must agree with your first point, I see bloggers that posting stuff everyday but they don’t deliver the information due to the very little time they spent on them, this may case losing their readers. On other hand, 2 or 3 well explained articles can do a massive job in term of engagement.

I have been seeing reviews about this book everywhere i’ll need to get my copy :D

thanks for sharing.

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@Faissalhaithami It’s funny how something that’s just been “mailed in” (for quick SEO or social share buzz) is so obvious, huh?

Here’s to long-term quality.

PS – You’ll love the book!

Brankica
3 years 3 months ago

Love all three things, although I obviously don’t have a problem with #2, haha.

Moving conversations to other venues sometimes worries people but bottom line, the more you talk to them on Twitter and FB, the higher your Klout will go, right @DannyBrown hahahaah… you know this is a joke but it was just hanging here ;)

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@Brankica Having been one of the folks that used to rail against conversations elsewhere, I know now how crazy that notion is. Like you say, miss, conversation is conversation, no matter where.

Well, *except* on Klout… ;-)

Brankica
3 years 3 months ago

PS sorry about the link attached, I have no clue what the F is wrong with LF

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@Brankica Haha, no worries – just check my link out, too! Maybe jenna langer can offer some advice. :)

penneyfox
3 years 3 months ago

Like the others, I’ve struggled with how many posts per week or sometimes, per month to write. Good to hear the advice that you’ve slowed down to posting less frequently – gives me some comfort to know that I’m on track as I’m figuring everything out and finding my voice.

My question to you and the others is this … how does everyone make the time to write? Between growing a business, working with clients, teaching workshops AND taking care of my son, it feels more and more like my time is limited. How do you find the time to fit all this writing into your world?

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@penneyfox I think that’s a question everyone faces, Penney, and probably has a different answer to as well! :)

For myself, I try and use the time at night when my wife and son are in bed to draft a post, or write and then schedule. Or, if I have some time at the weekend, I’ll do the same – write the post and schedule.

It’s a question of priorities – I know what mine are, and family rules above all else. Everything else, I build from that. :)

penneyfox
3 years 3 months ago

@DannyBrown I know what you mean about family. There are days when I stop work to pick my son up from school, get homework done and then take him to football practice. Those are the days when I’m working after he goes to bed.

Now if I can just figure out how to add more hours to the day then I’ll have my problem solved.:0)

Thanks for your response! Good to hear that others are dealing with the same struggles as me and finding ways to make it work.

HowieSPM
3 years 3 months ago

Oh, Livefyre is back. You off probation? We can fix that 8)

Great advice Danny. I tried to blog more and wasn’t finding the time. So I am infrequent but still blogging. I also am working on seeing if my G+ biz page can help by not only posting my blog links but other news and blog links of value to hopefully attract interest and conversation. And ..ahem…Google is adding features to blogger which I am curious might help my work since I still use that old fangled platform (so much easier than Word Press which is way confusing to me).

and yes your content and engagement I feel grew in stature when you got more confident in being a source for saying what so many people want to say but are too chicken too,

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@HowieSPM That’s definitely one of the key areas that Google can really score, mate, the Blogger angle. IF they put the effort into it again and not let it slide like they have with Feedburner.

PS – the new WordPress 3.3 is the bees knees. #jussayin’ ;-)

PookyH
3 years 3 months ago

I’m really interested to read this post as I’ve just started a brand new blog and it’s making me think carefully about what lessons I’m bringing to this blog that I’ve learnt elsewhere.

I think one of the most important ones has to be that now I am writing first and foremost about what interests me, rather than what I think will interest my audience because I have learnt in the past that in the end, your audience is most interested in reading about things that you’ve written more passionately about which is the inevitable consequence of writing posts based on what has piqued your interest or enthusiasm.

It’s very early days for my new blog yet (like, a week!) But I’ll be reading your blog with interest in future as it seems a great place to pick up ideas. Thank you!

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@PookyH One of the things I always do is write for me first, and then everything else (readers, comments, subscribers, etc) is a nice bonus. I tend to find that then allows me to realy experiment, and then (hopefully) write stuff that (had I been writing for a specific audience) may lead to a more sterile post.

The great thing with you having just started is you can really shape your own direction, and if you write what you’d want to read, that will come through to your visitors. And if they have any sense, they’ll appreciate that and keep coming back. :)

hypnodude
3 years 3 months ago

Actually I should write a bit more, but given that English is not my first language and that I usually aim for evergreen content that’s the best I can do, even if there is always room for improvement. As for social media I’m not very much on their side, they are an enormous waste of time with very little advantages, at least for business. Much better reading other people’s blogs and leave comments. This is my opinion, but I see what you say, that interacting there you drive more traffic to your website. Also I don’t like very much FB and Big G approach to privacy, while it’s their playground respect for those who keep you in business is the first thing.

I just wish I had found better informations about blogging before beginning but, well, at least I’m learning a lot now. :)

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@hypnodude When you write an evergreen post, language isn’t a barrier. Some of the best blogs I’ve read have been from people who live in Asia, India, Malaysia, Lebanon and other countries where English may not be the first language.

Seems you’re doing a great job of people recognizing you and looking out for your comments – and that’s never a bad thing. Look forward to seeing your blog grow as you continue. :)

hypnodude
3 years 3 months ago

@DannyBrown Thanks Danny, now I have to find a way for people to recognize me and look for my posts. :)

Not that it doesn’t happen, but I don’t think there is something like too many views. Thanks for your kind words.

Craig McBreen
3 years 3 months ago

Hi Danny,

I’ve been toying with the idea of posting 2-3 times a week, but am still not sure. Posting just once a week gives me the time I need to come up with a half-decent post. I might go to two, just to have two areas of focus each week. Maybe reading the book will help me decide.

About honestly. One of my favorite blog titles ever was your post about the Scoble Facebook fiasco ;) That certainly got my attention and your posts about some of the Twitter games people play were quite honest. That’s one of the reasons I come here. Well, there are many, but there’s one … honesty ;)

Thanks, Sir!

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@Craig McBreen And that’s the perfect approach, mate – why force yourself to do something when what you’re doing doesn’t need fixing? :)

Very glad to know you and have you part of this corner of the web, sir – cheers!

adamtoporek
3 years 3 months ago

Hah Danny. I’m trying to imagine a time when you were hesitant to speak out. I’ll have to go look at some of your old stuff. :)

Posting frequency has always been the challenge for me. To @Dragon Blogger ‘s comment, I need to get a schedule but even once secured, I think once or twice a week would be the max. There are a few blogs that pull off daily — but as you point out, niche is part of the dynamic and for the most part, you get more so-so posts that way. (been guilty of it myself)

I’ve really been enjoying some of the blogs that have attempted pillar type posts. They’re not good for quick scanning but they are usually great content and information.

Dragon Blogger
3 years 3 months ago

@adamtoporek Won’t like, I have had so-so posts bring in thousands of pageviews more than what I consider great articles occasionally just by catching the right trend, if you can convert those readers to check out something else or become fans even a short winded post can provide great benefit.

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@adamtoporek I don’t know what you’re trying to say, mate… ;-)

Yep, agree, I’ve read some blogs that can post daily and still maintain the quality – but I find them to be in the very small minority, compared to the alternative of less frequency, improved quality.

To your point about pillar posts, I’m a big fan of the “it’s done when it’s done” mantra. While a short post might be ideal for a quick visit, you can’t always get what you want across unless it’s a much longer effort. As long as it’s not long through waffling, a longer post can be among the best around.

Cheers mate.

adamtoporek
3 years 3 months ago

@DannyBrown Yeah, I did my first attempt at a pillar post a few weeks back — 3,400 words (hopefully, not too much waffling). Was a bit concerned I’d be dropping subscribers but it seemed to go well. I’m curious to see if it has some evergreen/SEO legs over time.

You’re right — the pillar posts are a lot of effort. I like your “it’s done when it’s done” mantra. A little positive reinforcement to not rush out the pillars until they are really ready. Heaven knows, it’s tempting to do so. :)

Take care.

easyP
3 years 3 months ago

Hi Danny

Saw your line “I even wrote a post about Twitter killing blog comments!”

I’ve not read your post but I thought exactly that when I joined twitter.

Much easier to knock out 140 characters than a real blog comment.

I’ll go over and read your post – may even leave a comment. LOL

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@easyP It also helps when you get something like livefyre allowing Twitter conversations to be imported. ;-)

Keira Desbiens
3 years 3 months ago

One thing I could certainly add in my enterprise blog is being more myself. Often, when talking for a company, we try to project professionalism and seriousness, resulting in an informative post that lacks spice: a post that could be created by a very bright robot!

My natural style is to be witty, more Mark Twain than Robbie the robot, yet that doesn’t come out at all. Next ones will be much more me and I think that will be fine.

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

You know whose blog I like a lot, from a big organization point of view? Bill Marriott, the guy that owns the hotel chain. Very personable yet still gets the corporate message across.

Being yourself definitely helps! :)

Dragon Blogger
3 years 3 months ago

Oh, I wanted to leave another comment regarding being more honest and speaking out. I am a transparent blogger in that I share everything online truthfully I am a big believer that a blogger has reputation and this is vital to survival and endurance in this market. But, if you do blog about “hot items” mostly political, religious, company bashing…etc. You should be very careful and be respectful and professional at all times. This is especially true for part time bloggers who have day jobs and careers trying to make ends meet. Remember what you say online affects not only you but the reputation of the company you work for, if you speak honestly and openly on a subject and it can affect a company reputation or view such you can put your job at risk. I am for free speech and always being honest, but I would rather not post my opinion on topics at all publicly if I think my day job could be jeopardized by my comments said publicly on either my blog or social media platforms.

Many people including bloggers have been fired for talking a little too freely on their personal blogs/social media accounts and make sure you find a balance. That being said, never promote a product you don’t 100% stand behind and believe in yourself. Double true with affiliate programs that you may try to sell. Always be honest with your readers when reviewing anything, and don’t be afraid to challenge or respond to challenges in a professional and tactful way.

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@Dragon Blogger Great points again, mate. I’m not one to shy away from stirring the pot, but I’ll always try and critique an idea, as opposed to the person. I know I can still do a better job of this, mind you, but that’s part of growing.

And completely agree about the product endorsement – if I’m going to recommend something, it will always be something I either use myself, ot have used for projects. It’s the only way to go.

Cheers, sir!

Lewis LaLanne aka Nerd #2
3 years 3 months ago

Love this thought Danny . . .

“engagement comes in all shapes and sizes, and while your blog may be the most desired place for discussion, true engagement allows the discussion to expand in all directions.”

What I’ve found is that where I’d prefer someone talk to me, isn’t necessarily where they want to talk to me and it’s dumb for me to rail against this.

For instance, some people hate Twitter. Why would I only limit them to engaging with me there.Some people are scared to voice their opinion where everyone in the world can see what they said in a blog comment. What good does it do me or them to try to muscle them out of their shell so that I can have my ego boosted by having my comment stats boosted?

What I’ve found, with our list of customers and fans is that they LOVE, LOVE, LOVE emailing us. They like the idea of having a private conversation directly with us. And even more than that, they love getting on the phone with us.

These are the preferences for the people giving us money and if that’s what they like, I’m more than willing to give it to them, even it keeps my Twitter stream, Facebook page and blog comments section looking like a ghost town. The money and their joyful private interactions are good enough for me. :)

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@Lewis LaLanne aka Nerd #2 You know, it’s funny, Lewis – so many people talk about the death of email, but some of the best exchanges I’ve had recently have come from emails where the reader wanted to expand the discussion further than the comments section. Just as your example shows, it’s the platform that the user prefers that makes all the difference. :)

craig cowbrough
3 years 3 months ago

I find that the value you can offer readers seriously diminishes if you set a target of one post per day. Post when when you’ve something useful to say

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@craig cowbrough Agreed, Craig – I know many of the blogs I read that post daily often have a mixed quality. Although, as @Dragon Blogger mentions in his comment, the frequency can often be dictated by the niche, and how instant a post needs to be.

TheJackB
3 years 3 months ago

@DannyBrown@craig cowbrough@Dragon Blogger I am biased because I often post more than once a day but I have found that my traffic is always better on days when I post more frequently.

My retention rate isn’t half bad either. I attribute most of that to trying to be honest and open with my readers. I probably could grow the comment section by slowing down but that doesn’t suit my style and that would hurt my writing.

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@TheJackB@craig cowbrough@Dragon Blogger

And that’s the beauty of this blogging beast, mate – everyone has different methods and each work for them. At the end of the day, like you say, that’s all that really matters. :)

LauLau81
3 years 3 months ago

Hi Danny, this is so true… Blogging needs us to be honest about certain things. Give your heart and mind about the thoughts and ideas you wanted to share. Thank you for stressing these points…

3HatsComm
3 years 3 months ago

I didn’t buy into ‘blog daily’ rule, knew it’d be too much. Think I’ve been pretty honest too, though I’ve been blinded by a well-written argument and can respect many points of view. I’m open to other networks, just my own way. I want a personal, ‘private’ space for F&F and chats away from business; don’t want friends getting hit w/ tons of updates from me about posting on this thread or that chat, all business. Now G+ I have been experimenting – trying not to just duplicate my Twitter feed, not to be ‘all business’ there either, but that is that audience. It’s a place to ‘think out loud’ for mini-posts and now, I’m thinking it may be ok to cross-post my own blog there too, see what happens.

My biggest mistakes: 1) not starting sooner and 2) not getting a better handle on the tech side (which is part of what scared/delayed me). I still have big moves to make which may cost me links and take more effort to fix now, but they’re on the to-do list. FWIW.

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@3HatsComm Google+ is definitely an intriguing beast, Davina. I’m still not sold on its business use, but as both an aggregator and curator of content, it’s got huge potential. Whether the uptake of the mainstream user will be enough remains to be seen, of course. ;-)

3HatsComm
3 years 3 months ago

@DannyBrown Certainly something there, I just have to figure out what, and how to work it into what’s already working for me and build on it.

GeeklessTech
3 years 3 months ago

Short, Sweet, and Solid Danny…I really agree with the posting less frequently. I see some posting a few a times a day in one of my “groups” and it’s just too much. Don’t force a blog post, just to have something.

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@GeeklessTech You know, it was like a weight off my shoulder when I changed my schedule – and I’m definitely enjoying blogging more because of it. :)

miketrap
3 years 3 months ago

I think the era of the blog island is over, especially for people unwilling to invest the time and energy you obviously invest in yours, Danny. I think we’re moving toward a more distributed model, and that doing so intelligently can be a boon for people who have something to add and want to do so easily. More thoughts on this here: http://bostinno.com/channels/forget-blogging-network-now Welcome yours.

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@miketrap I once read somewhere about gated communities, and how bloggers would be leading the charge to who sees what content. Completely agree with your take on the networking and distribution approach, Mike – be interesting to see who figures this out the best way.

miketrap
3 years 3 months ago

I think the era of the blog island is over, especially for people unwilling to invest the time and energy you obviously invest in yours, Danny. I think we’re moving toward a more distributed model, and that doing so intelligently can be a boon for people who have something to add and want to do so easily. More thoughts on this

here. Welcome yours.

Dragon Blogger
3 years 3 months ago

I made my own mistakes like waiting over a year to start a mailing list, 6 months late in creating a Facebook Fanpage when they first came out…etc. One thing I think for my technology blogging niche is that posting frequency can’t be reduced, there is just too much tech news to report on to delay posting schedules and post less frequently. To be current and trendy, you have to catch breaking news announcements that often are old news 3 days later. So I would say it depends on the blogging niche how often you feel you need to post, for general blogging tips/seo/how to blog I would say you don’t need the ever day. You do however need a consistent schedule, post every Monday, Wednesday, Friday…etc. Readers need to know when to expect new articles and to come back at set scheduling dates/times. If you have randomized post schedules you won’t be able to establish a pattern for readership.

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@Dragon Blogger You know, that’s a great point about the niche of the blog. Like you say, tech blogs especially need to be on the cusp of breaking news. I guess the trick there is to filter what’s worthy of being reported on, versus leaving it to everyone else in the space?

Dragon Blogger
3 years 3 months ago

@DannyBrown Exactly, and as you mentioned in another reply, different tactics work better for different blogger personality types, niches…etc. It is all about focus and experimentation. Generally though you will get lower bounce rates with less frequent, longer posts than a lot of shorter frequent posts.

jackielamp
3 years 3 months ago

Well this makes me feel a lot better about the fact that I haven’t written a blog post in about a month ;)

Great points made. As always. I enjoy your philosophy on blogging and our favorite word “engagement.”

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@jackielamp Thanks, Jackie – it’s funny, but I see bloggers that post maybe once every other month, and they still enjoy the readers and comments that more frequent blogs enjoy. So, the “formula” may not be the formula after all. ;-)

luislondon
3 years 3 months ago

People can read your Honesty if they follow your blog. There is an important realtionship between readers and bloggers, it can actually get personal. Some of them may be potential clients or collegues, so being honest is key always.

DannyBrown
3 years 3 months ago

@luislondon It’s why I like blogs with open comment policies, and where the blogger really encourages the reader to take part afterward. You get to know each other, and can filter out when someone is just in it for the views, versus in it for the viewpoints.

Cheers!