TOTAL SHARES 226

Build fierce loyalty

Loyalty. A funny concept. One that can mean so many different things to different people at different times.

Sports teams have loyalty from their fans. Well, the true ones do. Think Manchester City as opposed to Manchester United, where the latter’s “fans” are more interested in prawn sandwiches than a good soccer team.

Indie bands have loyalty from their fans. Until they sign that big record deal, that is, then they become sell-outs.

Humans have loyalty from their dogs. But then you would be pretty loyal as long as you had someone cleaning up your shit.

So, yeah, loyalty – a funny concept. And yet it’s something that’s so important to so many people, they spend their lifetime(s) trying to work out how they can build loyalty around what they do.

After all, build loyalty, you build bigger success, right? More sales; repeat sales; referrals. Get that gold rush and you don’t have to worry about marketing.

Okay, maybe just a bit about marketing (I’m a marketer by trade, so I’d be dumb to say you didn’t need my services, right?).

So, yeah – loyalty is something pretty much everyone wants to achieve in some form or another. And not just loyalty, but fierce loyalty. Because if you grab that piece of gold, the world is truly your oyster. That shit starts revolutions.

And so companies spend thousands (millions?) on trying to create loyalty programs. Bloggers spend thousands of words trying to say the things they think their readers want to hear to become loyal. Social media “gurus” spend all day on Twitter when they should be doing real work, just to try and get that extra loyal follower to buy into their crud.

And it’s all a waste of time. Seriously.

Because you don’t need to spend thousands, if not millions, of dollars trying to build loyalty. You don’t need to be that desperate typist. You don’t need to be that good-for-nothing-except-quotes-for-Mashable social media douche whose only loyalty comes from those laughing at him religiously.

If you want loyalty – fierce loyalty – it’s easy. Be fiercely loyal first.

Show people you care. Show people you mean what you say. Every time. Show people they can trust you. Show people you deserve that trust. Show people you’re not a dick who simply panders to those stroking your ego (or your dick). Show people every one of them is equal.

And it’s not fucking hard to do this.

  • If you’re a blogger, encourage dissention of your views and don’t let fanboys be your voice.
  • If you’re a business, embrace your critics as much as your fans (if not more so).
  • If you’re a manager, let everyone speak and not just Tommy Kiss Ass.

In fact, no matter what you do, in what discipline and in what medium, it’s really not hard at all to build loyalty.

Think like the person you want to become loyal to you and ask what really matters to them.

Get that simple thing right and you’ll have loyalty so fierce you’ll wonder why you were making it so difficult to achieve to begin with.

This post originally appeared on Sarah Robinson’s 28 Days to Build Fierce Loyalty series.

image: Jean-

TOTAL SHARES 226
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86 Comments on "If You Want Fierce Loyalty, You Need To Be Fiercely Loyal First"


ekoutanov
2 years 8 months ago

Customer loyalty, like many other things, can be bought. But, as a merchant, you must be willing to pay a price. Most of the time, if done correctly, the rewards to the business far outweigh the cost – 5:1 if not more. One barrier that business must always overcome is the startup costs with establishing a loyalty program. One low cost solution is http://mazecard.com.au – no startup costs, and no contracts.

DanielSharkov
2 years 11 months ago

@improvComm Good one by @DannyBrown indeed. Glad you enjoyed it! :-)

VeganPetman
3 years 7 days ago

RT Wow I love this!!! @kathikruse If You Want Fierce Loyalty You Have to be Fiercely Loyal First http://t.co/mN676LdT via @DannyBrown

Sayersview
3 years 13 days ago

I love this line “If you’re a business, embrace your critics as much as your fans” because it where we could learn and improve more. Thanks

John_Trader1
3 years 19 days ago

@joeldon No problem Joe – how is use of the app coming along?

Rhonda Hurwitz
3 years 19 days ago

great piece.

Traci Hayner Vanover
3 years 19 days ago

I blog as I speak as well. I also podcast with the same sass and fervor that I would in a one-on-one conversation. I left the corporate lifestyle behind me over a decade ago, and I certainly don’t miss it. There is value in transparency, when it is genuine.

Robert Herzog
3 years 19 days ago

Great post, Danny.

John Paul Aguiar
3 years 19 days ago

:)

Danny Brown
3 years 19 days ago

Traci But that’s too much like common sense, miss, and we know how that’s lacking in so many, sadly. ;-)

Danny Brown
3 years 19 days ago

John Amen, brother.

Traci Hayner Vanover
3 years 19 days ago

Excellent post, Danny! But most importantly, it is SPOT ON. That kind of candor is refreshing! Folks need to worry less about numbers (be they on Twitter, FB, or elsewhere), and more about furthering the conversation.

Jeff McCauley
3 years 19 days ago

Interesting. Never thought of setting personal standards based on the fact that there are worse things. Guess we will have to agree to disagree

John Paul Aguiar
3 years 19 days ago

You gotta jump first if you expect people to jump with you.

Danny Brown
3 years 19 days ago

Because I blog as I speak, then people know what to expect. And there are worse things in life than bad language. ;-)

Jeff McCauley
3 years 19 days ago

I appreciate the vulgarity warning, but As a business person, why use language that might offend?

tracibrowne
3 years 21 days ago

“If you’re a manager, let everyone speak and not just Tommy Kiss Ass.”
I had to really laugh at that.  The one time I took an actual job with a company, not as a consultant, the CEO said he liked that I spoke my mind and to never stop.  He needed more people around him like that. That was until I criticized something he felt was his baby…suddenly my opinions were not welcome. I’ve learned since then that when people say they want their charges to speak out and up, they rarely mean it.

DannyBrown
3 years 21 days ago

 @tracibrowne Ha, jeez ain’t that the truth, Traci? Sadly, like you share, it’s all well and good saying you want something. But if you lack the balls to follow that up with action when needed, then you may as well not have pretended to be supportive in the first place…
 
Cheers, miss!

DannyBrown
3 years 22 days ago

@DavidNevin88 You’d like to hope so :)

AmyMccTobin
3 years 23 days ago

For a minute there I thought this was a post on http://www.punkviewsonsocialmedia.com , but then I realized the cursing was just for emphasis:)  And on a Sunday too….
 
Once again smart marketing comes down to basic human decency and common sense.    Loved the post – no wonder you’re #1 on Hubspot’s list.

DannyBrown
3 years 21 days ago

 @AmyMccTobin I was actually consdering posting there, but I think that blog will be winding down, sadly – not enough time for the contributors to spare for the content to be consistent. We’ll see.
 
I’m sure that Hubspot list is upside down, still, but thanks. :)

AmyMccTobin
3 years 20 days ago

 @DannyBrown Well, I met danieleagee  there, so it was worth something;)  

DannyBrown
3 years 23 days ago

@nlakeland Ha, you and me both, mate ;)

DannyBrown
3 years 23 days ago

@CASUDI Always too kind miss, thank you :)

jasondyk
3 years 23 days ago

Great post Danny, 
Loyalty comes from being an example to your “followers,” if you show them you are loyal and will be loyal to them they are far more interested in returning that loyalty.  It’s not about the money being spent or the giveaways you offer, it’s about being there for them.  
 
Sidenote: I do find it funny about all these REALLY busy social media “gurus” that are so busy with all these clients, and all they do is sit on twitter all day….when are they working on their clients work then? 
 
Jason

DannyBrown
3 years 21 days ago

 @jasondyk Hi there mate,
 
Truer words never said, sir. You can soon spot who’s building their “community” just to fleece them shortly after (and, usually, the bigger the name, the more the fleecing).
 
Ha, and I’m glad you noticed that about the “gurus” – yeah, that constant tweeting really must bring in the bucks for your clients, huh? ;-)

samtaracollier
3 years 24 days ago

“If you’re a manager, let everyone speak and not just Tommy Kiss Ass” -my favorite line.  You are so refreshingly real Danny.  Building loyalty can seem as easy as deciphering how to make antimatter (just had this conversation with my 8-year-old son – not easy).  But like all things, the concept is simple. You give, you get. 
 
Hope you’re having a lovely weekend!
Sam

DannyBrown
3 years 24 days ago

 @samtaracollier Ah, now your son sounds exactly like th camping buddy I wish I had had at eight – antimatter, indeed, love it! :)
 
And, just to add to your thought, miss, the more you give without expecting to get in return, the more you actually get. Like you say, simple. ;-)
 
Have a great rest of Sunday!

wmwebdes
3 years 24 days ago

Hi Danny
How come you always hit that nail bang on the head.
Loyalty! What on earth is loyalty?
 
Love it Danny, stroking and all.

ElaineJoli
3 years 24 days ago

I am a bit concerned about the phrase “fierce loyalty.”  You have tossed this phrase in, as if a blogger, or brand, just by asking people what matters to them and then catering to them on a consistent basis will get a group of people who will remain fiercely loyal.  I think fierce loyalty is a category that belongs to people/causes/ideas that impact your life in a real way – I can be fiercely loyal to my mate or to my friends (or my dog), and fiercely loyal to my non-profit to raise money and awareness for sick children – but I am I fiercely loyal to my BMW or to a favorite blogger?   I can be loyal to a cause – but fiercely loyal means I want to defend the cause – I walk the talk – I raise money, I write my congressman, I get involved.  I think there is merit in the topic of how to get a more loyal following for your brand, but I think there is a bit of hyperbole in your post.

ElaineJoli
3 years 24 days ago

I don’t disagree that you have captured the essence of being loyal and building loyalty – all good, as my Aussie friends would say (actually a really good thought provoking post).  And I would have finished my Sunday morning coffee, had the word “fiercely” not shown up. 

DannyBrown
3 years 24 days ago

 @ElaineJoli Hi Elaine,
 
Had I not written the two paragraphs above that phrase you picked out, I might agree with it. But I don’t suggest you cater to people; instead, I simply share my thoughts on what builds loyalty. And as these paragraphs show, it’s definitely not catering.
 
Cheers.

rdopping
3 years 24 days ago

Hey Danny,
All good stuff here but is it really that easy? Just based on some of the douchehats you pointed out one thing that we all need to be really good at is recognizing that our loyalty to someone else may not be entirely reciprocal. The skill is recognizing that.
 
Now, I am no authority on the subject but to me there are three degrees of difficulty of interaction in achieving the all coveted loyalty; 1. people you know and/or work with – easiest. 2. potential clients or new aquaintences – harder and 3. the on-line world – most difficult.
 
I say that because there is a ton of discourse about how and who you can trust and on-line seems to give a lot of assholes the courage to abuse the privilege of contact. Anyway, I just think trust and loyalty go hand in hand and I agree loyalty is bank. Big, big bank but trust is also big bank. Either can be lost very, very quickly with one wrong move.
 
Good post. I clearly need to read Sarah Robinson’s 28 Days stuff. So many blogs, so little time.

DannyBrown
3 years 24 days ago

 @rdopping Hi there Ralph,
 
Great points, and conpletely agree – the loyalty question is definitely one that has several layers to it, and trust is a huge part of it, as I mention in the post.
 
The funny thing is, some of the people I’ve inherently trusted – friends, business partners, family members – have let me down, while those that I’ve previously questioned have turned into some of the folks I’m most loyal to. Go figure. ;-)

ThePaulSutton
3 years 24 days ago

Totally agree with the sentiment of this post, Danny. Great stuff.
 
BUT…in the name of dissention, doesn’t everyone like to believe they’re loyal? I mean, challenge 1000 people to read this post and ask the question of themselves ‘am I loyal to my employees/ employer/ colleagues?’ and I’d put money on 1000 of them saying yes (or close to). The point being, people will read this and relate it to how they’re treated, not how they treat others as they’ll already believe they’re doing the things you recommend. I might be wrong, but what do you think? Am I just being cynical?

DannyBrown
3 years 24 days ago

 @ThePaulSutton Hi mate,
 
Good question, and I’d say a lot of it depends on how truly honest we are with ourselves. I know for a fact that I haven’t been as loyal as I should have been with some folks (see my reply to @rdopping ), and that I was blinded by friendship and let that crap continue longer than it should have.
 
Recognizing that made a huge difference in how I approach loyalty. Maybe that’s the answer for others, too?
 
Cheers for a great thought, sir.

TheJackB
3 years 24 days ago

Great post and I mean that sincerely. Nothing to add other than my support.

DannyBrown
3 years 25 days ago

@RTRViews Cheers Rick – thought it was time for a little “punk”… ;)

Mark Longbottom
3 years 25 days ago

No surprises Danny it’s simply natural human behavior – or is it.
 
I do like the shining Messiah you’ve become by telling [business] people the blindingly obvious way to act.

DannyBrown
3 years 25 days ago

 @Mark Longbottom Hi mate – you’d like to think we do things properly without thinking. Then again… ;-)