TOTAL SHARES 502

One of the current buzz terms being bandied about by businesses today is that of “brand storytelling” – how brands can use storytelling to share their core values, win more customers, and outstrip the competition.

Never mind the fact that brand storytelling is as old as the first advertisement (not that that’s ever stopped social media hijacking old and proclaiming it as new), everyone’s talking about making the business human through stories.

The problem is, too many brands use storytelling poorly – the McDonald’s “Writer” ad being one such example where you were left questioning what the brand values were (a  key part in successful brand storytelling).

Get brand storytelling right, however, and you connect not just the dots between customer and brand, but the audience overall. Which is why the “Moments of Warmth” ad from Duracell Canada is so successful.

[youtube]http://youtu.be/-mQZqKLiMIg[/youtube]

Why Moments of Warmth Works

This winter has been one of the harshest, coldest winters in recent memory for a lot of people, and the term “Polar Vortex” became mainstream.

Recognizing this, Duracell Canada played to everyone’s weariness of winter, and – for a moment – brought a little warmth into peoples’ lives. The trick, though, was that moment wasn’t just meant to be for the duration of their stay in the bus stop.

Instead, by playing out a bigger message – “we all need each other” – it says even when things are at their toughest, we can make it through if we stick together.

By promoting human connection as the glue that makes everything tick – versus individual actions – Duracell Canada not only shares their corporate values, but also how they see world around them, and our ability to work together to make a difference.

Best of all, it’s not even a hard sell on behalf of Duracell Canada – instead, it focuses on the people (customers) and how Duracell can help (by being there when you need them). It’s a softer sell, but still effective – I know which batteries I’ll be stocking up on next visit to the hardware store.

Kudos.

TOTAL SHARES 502
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23 Comments on "THIS Is How You Do Brand Storytelling"


External Blog: Storytelling Makes It Real | CHELSEA CHOI'S BLOG
3 months 16 days ago

[…] differentiation as strategies behind successful marketing. What we haven’t explored yet that blogger Danny Brown writes about, is the effectiveness of brand […]

creativeoncall
7 months 7 days ago

Danny Brown It’s tough to tell a convincingly, honestly human story when you’ve got a committee of storytellers on both the client and agency sides guiding, tweaking and judging the story, so yes, it is, at least organizationally, a seemingly no-win situation for brands.  All the more amazing, I suppose, when a big brand actually pulls it off.

Danny Brown
7 months 7 days ago

creativeoncall I think (for me) that’s the big difference, mate. Sure, it’s still a promo – but it’s one that’s put together with real people and, by association, real heart and emotion. Sometimes I feel brands can’t win when it comes to telling a story.

creativeoncall
7 months 7 days ago

The best brand stories are true stories; not that you can’t use fiction, as McDonald’s attempts here, but to your point, the fiction has to be illuminated by a core brand truth.   This McD spot is simply an ad agency’ stylishly gratuitous attempt to falsely shift the brand personality.  The Duracell initiatve may be taken to task as a gimmick, as http://www.livefyre.com/profile/5760/ does below, but Duracell at least constructed a world scenario in which brands and consumers could interact to illuminate a little of each other’s truth.

Il était une fois le Brand Storytelling par Neocamino
7 months 16 days ago

[…] Alors avec toujours autant de courage et de motivation, j’affronte tel un chevalier de la table ronde le deuxième article. Et là halleluja ! Je tombe sur une définition claire “Brand Storytelling – how brands can use storytelling to share their core values, win more cu… […]

SCH CONSULTING – 3 Ways to Make Your Marketing Stick
10 months 24 days ago

[…] want to deal with people who “get” them. So get them. Danny Brown offers the example of Duracell Canada, which taps the emotions of people needing to connect during a particularly bitter […]

3 Ways to Make Your Marketing Stick – Growing Your Wealth Is Important
10 months 24 days ago

[…] want to deal with people who “get” them. So get them. Danny Brown offers the example of Duracell Canada, which taps the emotions of people needing to connect during a particularly bitter […]

THIS Is How You Do Brand Storytelling | Danny B...
10 months 26 days ago

[…] …The problem is, too many brands use storytelling poorly – the McDonald’s “Writer” ad being one such example where you were left questioning what the brand values were (a key part in successful brand storytelling). Get brand storytelling right, however, and you connect not just the dots between customer and brand, but the audience overall. Which is why the “Moments of Warmth” ad from Duracell Canada is so successful….  […]

THIS Is How You Do Brand Storytelling | Danny B...
10 months 26 days ago

[…] …The problem is, too many brands use storytelling poorly – the McDonald’s “Writer” ad being one such example where you were left questioning what the brand values were (a key part in successful brand storytelling).Get brand storytelling right, however, and you connect not just the dots between customer and brand, but the audience overall. Which is why the “Moments of Warmth” ad from Duracell Canada is so successful….  […]

JubertSagun
10 months 28 days ago

Thanks for sharing some great tips Danny.. It was a great read..

Weekly Marketing Cache 04.07.2014
10 months 29 days ago

[…] Danny Brown was talking about the “age old” brand storytelling and how to properly do it. Duracell Canada is who he pointed to as the perfect reflection of a […]

DannyBrown
10 months 29 days ago

rbartleyann And it’s Canadian! IABCtoronto Duracell

Danny Brown
10 months 29 days ago

Howie Goldfarb  The purchase sway isn’t always a given, for sure – though I do feel that brands that offer a feel-good sentiment probably remain more memorable than others when it comes to decision time. Then again, like you, I often just got for the deal over brand, depending on the purchase.

rbartleyann
10 months 29 days ago

IABCtoronto DannyBrown This is an awesome and heartwarming story with great #PR on behalf of Duracell

Howie Goldfarb
10 months 30 days ago

I love these gimmicks. VW did that NYC Subway stairwell keyboard that as you walked down it lit up and made music.Coke has those vending machines. I like the fact humans have to hold hands especially strangers…and gloved ones. In summer could be icky LOL

The reason I don’t like these is while nice they don’t change my view of a product or brand. For Duracell who battles Energizer it comes down to how long the battery lasts. I have tried the cheap batteries from the club stores and they don’t last as long as energizer or duracell. So the extra $2 a package probably gets me more than $2 more of power. But to be honest if you asked me which battery lasts longer..I would respond no clue I buy the best deal at the store.

Danny Brown
10 months 30 days ago

RobBiesenbach Lisa Gerber  It reminds me of the Molson ads from a couple of years back – they tie their product into everything that’s great about Canada, and it was a huge hit.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X_yW4-cgG4g

Danny Brown
10 months 30 days ago

Lisa Gerber  Patagonia is a great example of brand and corporate messaging being completely in sync with the product/audience. It’s not rocket science to make these kinds of thing happen – you just need to remember where you came from and what your goal is.

Danny Brown
10 months 30 days ago

lil_tea  Look forward to seeing what you guys come up with, I need to dive into Unbounce a little more in the near future (had it on backburner for investigation).

DannyBrown
10 months 30 days ago

stevequigley I like how Duracell makes it seem so effortless. Other brands could learn a lot from them. #BUNewMedia #BUPRSSA

lil_tea
10 months 30 days ago

I love this idea from Duracell! Having grown up in cold northern BC winters, I always wished they had something like this. These https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HfHV4-N2LxQ that bring people closer together are a nice change in a digital world :) Couldn’t agree more that the fit of the story with the brand is just as if not more important than the story itself. Perfect choice to use the McDonald’s ad for contrast.
And this concept applies to all communications—not just ads. We’re currently making up an explainer video for Unbounce and ensuring that the story really matches with our company and culture was an important consideration during planning.

lauraclick
11 months 2 hours ago

Wow. That ad gave me chills! So very cool. A great message and an excellent tie-in with the brand. Thanks for sharing!

The 4 Most Important Steps to Finding Great Customers Online (#4 is My Favorite)
11 months 3 hours ago

[…] is from someone who knows how to effectively build a brand and market online, Danny Brown. In my eBook, he clearly outlines steps you can take today to effectively utilize data and, wait […]

Lisa Gerber
11 months 5 hours ago

I love that!!! It reminds of the little heating areas on the Chicago El, where people actually have to huddle together in the warmth waiting for the train. And we talk – because we’re all so close. 

Where I see brands fail is they try to do something (like this, for example) but there is no tie-in with who they are or what they do. Which is what you’re saying. I’ve been in love with Patagonia’s Worn Wear video series where they feature people who have used a piece of gear/clothing for 25 years and tell the story of where that piece has been (a hat that has traveled 10,000 miles of hiking). It inspires people to get out there, but it furthers their message to be kind to the environment and to reuse – which is why they make stuff that is designed to last a long time. 

Also, all that snow looked good to me. :)