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This is a guest post from Tinu Abayomi-Paul.

When you hear the word “community”, even in the present context of social media and marketing, what comes to your mind?

Do you see faces of people you know, admire? People with common interests that you share? Or do you see nothing? Perhaps a faceless blob of usernames?

In the colloquial sense of the word, I belong to many communities, some of them overlapping. Yet it’s starting to worry me, this context of community when framed by the language of marketing.

Particularly in the case where companies identify a demographic and someone at the top executive level mandates that the company needs to “own” that market, via a sort of hi-jacking of that community.

I Belong to Communities

They can’t really be “hijacked” or “infiltrated”. However, they can be led, and their loyalties can be won, but this has to happen as a natural result of a kind of partnership with them.

How well this task is carried out has direct bearing upon whether these communities develop into rabid fan bases (see Apple) or just a group of people you’re tracking who barely move the cash needle (see any company that competes on the basis of price instead of value).

They are made up of people I go out of my way to advise, assist, appreciate and attend to when I can – not just when it’s required by the community manager/leader hat I have on that day. And I worry about this concept because there’s this false impression that a community is an entity that can be owned.

Like a thing.

Instead of a gathered group of humans.

This is a special problem of people who are asked to be community managers or leaders. More often than not, we rise through the community to come to lead it, even if it happens to also be a job title.

And as such, we have a sense of belonging to it – it’s what makes us ideal candidates, the rare individuals that had already started to lead the community before someone realized that giving them some monetary incentive could benefit them.

Parties of Trust

Whenever I’m asked to assume these duties, I make it clear that I can see both the side of the company that needs a return on its investment, and the community, that has certain needs and desires that must be fulfilled. And that these two things don’t need to be at odds if both parties are willing to trust me.

Yet at the same time, I notice that at some point, we’re also expected to have a standoffish, doctor-patient type of relationship with the people we may call peers, acquaintances, even friends. Not just by the companies, but by the community – for example, when settling disputes between members.

It can suddenly become an uncomfortable spot to be in, given that it’s only a matter of time before you are asked by the corporate body that funds the extra fun of the collective, to do something you believe to be against the best interests of the community.

  • Block a user from talking instead of letting controversial discussions play out.
  • Take a beloved resource you collectively built for years away from the people who made it successful.
  • Act on some marketing initiative before enough trust has been built for it to take proper hold.

Especially in social media, the way communities are increasingly treated as commodities is a step backwards. What is the point of social media? On the community level, isn’t part of it to create relationships? Of course there’s no illusion that a brand is going to be BFFs with its adopted collective.

But a community manager can often leverage a fledgling connection on Twitter into an alliance between two companies. Anyone in sales will tell you that buying is about relationships. It always has been – social media certainly didn’t invent this, but it highlights it. So much is based on that.

Customer influence and advocacy

And so many incredible, profitable partnerships can result from them.

Something as simple as a retweet can lead to a guest post by a respected thought leader. The smart ones will then willingly bring their community to where their work was published.

One simple example – but try letting your community champion repeat that process once a week for a year, and track how much the additional exposure leads to sales from that new audience.

The Patience of Community

Here’s the catch: that can only happen if your company can develop the patience to let whoever coordinates with your group of enthused, active people plant the seeds that result in those successes and let them grow. No one digs up an acorn every few weeks to see if it has become a mighty oak yet.

It has increasingly become my experience that it’s not that social can’t be effective for attracting new clients, or retaining the existing ones. It’s really that we business owners lack the patience it takes to truly grow and create a business rather than a series of one-off sales.

If we can’t measure a success 2.1 seconds after an action, it’s seen as useless and thrown away.

And yet, when I was in sales, it was routine for me to attend company-sponsored parties, and attend sporting events with prospects, not clients, to have lunch, meetings, phone calls for months before a sale was ever made.

In this instant gratification age, we need to remember that we have the unique ability to shift the investment that used to be wasted building relationships that never come to fruition into systems that work better and faster if we will simply resist the urge to snap to judgement, and wait for them to mature and ripen.

So my question to you is this: what can us successful community managers do to move the idea of community as commodity to a more realistic picture that reflects how community alliances can be a win for everyone involved?

Thought leadership and setting better expectations are two things that come to mind. But those assume you’re working with people who “get it”. What if our peers are not? What advice can you offer?

Or perhaps you disagree with me. Can we shift this idea? Should we?

The comments are yours.

Tinu Abayomi-PaulAbout the author: Tinu Abayomi-Paul is CEO of Leveraged Promotion, the first Hot Mommas Project Women’s Leadership Fellow, and a member of Network Solutions Social Web Advisory Board.

You can read more from Tinu at the Leveraged Promotion blog, or connect with her on Twitter.

image: Gwendal Uguen

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41 Comments on "The Value and Meaning of Community In Marketing"


How to Build the Trust You Need for an Engaged Community
8 months 17 days ago

[…] Abayomi-Paul’s recent post The Value and Meaning of Community in Marketing explained why attempting to command a community is fraught with […]

Liz
8 months 17 days ago

Fantastic and timely post. I attended a conference last weekend and as I tend to do, I raised my hand and commented… a lot. What I learnt after the fact that people paid attention, and remembered. This is a group or community, mind you, of which I’ve been a member for well over a decade. I’ve never had a presence in it aside from a comment or two on a listserv. The parallels that I can draw here is that commitment and intent go a long way – true relationships are rarely built on a single conversation.

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9 months 5 days ago

[…] The Value and Meaning of Community In Marketing […]

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9 months 19 days ago

[…] If “content” is the top marketing buzzword these days, “community” is a close second. In a lot of ways, building community is far more complex than creating content. Tinu Abayomi-Paul (@Tinu), writing at Danny Brown’s (@DannyBrown) blog, does a deep dive into The Value and Meaning of Community In Marketing. […]

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9 months 24 days ago

[…] If “content” is the top marketing buzzword these days, “community” is a close second. In a lot of ways, building community is far more complex than creating content. Tinu Abayomi-Paul (@Tinu), writing at Danny Brown’s (@DannyBrown) blog, does a deep dive into The Value and Meaning of Community In Marketing. […]

Danny Brown
9 months 25 days ago

PeterJ42 Certainly allows for more accountability and backing up of opinion with facts, which is never a bad thing. :) Tinu

PeterJ42
9 months 25 days ago

Tinu PeterJ42  Absolutely. In the past there were probably only a few books on a subject. By knowing those, people could “own that topic”. That led to an “I know and you don’t” superiority complex.

Now that anyone can pick up enough to catch you out on your facts it is far wiser to be more collaborative – an “I believe” rather than an “I know” approach. And we are all learning more as a result. Fun isn’t it?

Tinu
9 months 25 days ago

PeterJ42 I don’t believe it has ever been true that any one person or philosophy has all the answers.

PeterJ42
9 months 25 days ago

Tinu PeterJ42  Try http://www.challenging-concepts.com where I run four blogs on different subjects.
But the real answer, these days, is no one person has all the ideas – all they have is a map to connect things and lots of nodes where there are experts. Danny, for example, added to my knowledge on Influence. Hopefully we can use eachother in the same way, Tinu. Nice to make your acquaintance.

Randy Milanovic
9 months 26 days ago

Initial promo did not mention of Canva. Follow ups did. My questions about transparency were redirected to the the Canva mention in follow up posts.

Danny Brown
9 months 26 days ago

Randy Milanovic  I’ve seen a bunch of these around the web and was curious about the genesis – is this a paid promo on behalf of Canva? It sure looks that way. And, if so, would appear to be in breach of FTC mandates.

Randy Milanovic
9 months 26 days ago

Here’s one social event that’s producing a huge amount of activity for Canva. https://plus.google.com/114918475211209783081/posts/MyiX3LRXGvr
On the surface, magnanimous, though the benefits to Canva are enormous. Big name participants in the ‘free’ effort are Peg and Guy (who is also a Canca investor).
I truly believe that had the original promotion stated that participation requirements included Canva promotion, many people would have participated anyway. However, participants did not learn of the Canva connection until committing to the exercise.
I mention this only as my opinion. I trust all will take it as such and not sue me for speaking my mind, or gang up in me because they might be a fan.

Danny Brown
9 months 27 days ago

Randy Milanovic  I think what you’re seeing is the last swan dive of those “consultants” that have seen the social media gravy train ride out (you know, the one that needs no metrics or ROI validation), and now they’re trying to make one last buck before their fragile palace comes crashing down around them… ;-)

Danny Brown
9 months 27 days ago

MartinGBEdwards Adding this. :) Tinu

Danny Brown
9 months 27 days ago

MartinGBEdwards HA! Ah, how I recall the Ratner speech (I was still living in the UK at the time). Man, talk about ripping down everything you’ve built in one foolish statement. 
For anyone that’s not familiar with the Ratner case, it’s a great example of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerald_Ratner with poor training on how to act when publicly speaking about your brand and its products. Tinu

Randy Milanovic
9 months 27 days ago

I’ve started seeing unrelated sponsors being mentioned/thanked during HOAs, social marketing campaigns thinly veiled as follower-participation events and the oddest thing of all, lemming-like approval of the interruptions. Where’s social headed?

MartinGBEdwards
9 months 27 days ago

Danny Brown MartinGBEdwardsTinuIt was! I did’nt want to bandy the name about but it did seem to me that the problem was’nt so much the joke but the reaction of the sm team to the complaints. These communities can be very much like bubbles held together with trust and emotion, it does’nt take much to break them.  I dd write somthing about this on my blog http://martinsocially.com/how-to-be-honest/ which was comparing the Gerald Ratner debarcle to the current need for transparency.

Danny Brown
9 months 27 days ago

MartinGBEdwards Awesome, great to hear, mate – I’ll ping you an email later this morning re. “details”. Cheers! Tinu PeterJ42

MartinGBEdwards
9 months 27 days ago

Danny Brown TinuMartinGBEdwardsPeterJ42Just saw this as I was replying to Tinu! I am certainly up for it! I’m a relative newcomer to this writing business but I’d be happy to try to get some thoughts into a readable shape. Shall I send a draft over to you?

MartinGBEdwards
9 months 27 days ago

Tinu Thanks for those encouraging words Tinu,  I have’nt written anything specific on this yet – to be honest it was reading your article which focussed it but I have been mulling over the whole brand/authenticity thing for a while now so I will try to put something together.  I do see it as one of the big things that many companies struggle with when approaching social media community building.

Danny Brown
9 months 27 days ago

MartinGBEdwards  Was that the brand that compared how someone thought she looked at a sci-fi convention, and then had a comparison image that was less than favourable? Tinu

Danny Brown
9 months 27 days ago

Tinu I’m more than happy for MartinGBEdwards to guest post to expand on the group structure (and his bigger picture view) if Martin is up for it. :) PeterJ42

MartinGBEdwards
9 months 27 days ago

Absolutely. We as consumers also have to learn that this new freedom brings with it the responsibility to be more tolerant of failure and not just be looking for opportunities to carp or claim. Although the example I was thinking about was more a breech of authenticity than a product or service issue.

Tinu
9 months 27 days ago

Randy Milanovic  I had a Very disturbing experience with that type of thing once that caused me to sever ties with a company. They weren’t being malicious but the ignorance was overwhelming. If we can’t create connections to serve and give to our communities, we don’t deserve their alliance.

Tinu
9 months 27 days ago

OpEdMarketing  I hadn’t heard of that book either. Thank you for that. I agree with you on taking things to the next level. Have written on that many times. I believe social is a great place to get Acquainted but we need to take more steps to establish an understanding Offline whenever possible. With hangouts, Skype, and the tools we have it doesn’t even have to cost a fortune. Excellent point. Thanks for commenting.

Tinu
9 months 27 days ago

Danny Brown PeterJ42  Fascinating and insightful point, Danny.

Tinu
9 months 27 days ago

PeterJ42  So thoughtful. Where do YOU keep all your thoughts? :)

Tinu
9 months 27 days ago

MartinGBEdwards Danny Brown  I’ve noticed that cynicism too. It’s less prominent outside the States in my view. But it’s there, and honestly I think the suspicion is well earned. We can do a better service to people by marketing with truth, by being more upfront and transparent with communities without exposing companies to liability issues and the like. 
But I also see instances where companies to everything we demand of them in the world of new media, and still meet with angry responses. Why should companies trust communities if we tell them it’s ok to screw up if they’re upfront with us, but when they do we turn our backs? Is that fair? Is some of the issue on us in our roles as consumers?

Tinu
9 months 27 days ago

Danny Brown  I find that area so difficult to deal with. I joke on my blog that if you want to buy my opinion my price is $2.1 million. By that I mean that I’m not opposed to, say, having a relevant tech item like a computer sent to me for review, but I will disclose my true feelings on the item no matter what.
Which is fine for the audience who knows and trusts me, but what about the ones who don’t? How would they know I’m not just a shill if I accept money or goods in return for reviews? 
I believe that we Can evolve communities, but we need a framework other than compliance with the US FTC rules or similar bodies in other countries. 

Those are great questions that I think we should all discuss at length. There aren’t easy answers here but they really do need to be addressed. Thanks for having me on your blog Danny, and for commenting.

Tinu
9 months 27 days ago

MartinGBEdwards PeterJ42  I would really love to see us achieve both. There can be a symbiotic relationship between a community and a company, not in the traditional sense of the word of course, but a connection can be maintained where we can look at both ROI *and* group structure. I would love to see you write more about the group structure aspect if you have a link?
Love the term “overfishing too.” Thanks for commenting.